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Native English speakers, could you please help me with these issues?

1. Are these sentences correct:

a) "My cousin says that when her mother was still alive, she used to speak Italian with her, and now only speaks Italian when she goes to an Italian restaurant, but that's not enough to keep her COMMAND of Italian."

b) "My cousin says that when her mother was still alive, she used to speak Italian with her, and now only speaks Italian when she goes to an Italian restaurant, but that's not enough to keep her GRASP of Italian."

2. In this context, do 'command' and 'grasp' mean the same?

Or does 'command' imply a broader knowledge?

4 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    "My cousin says that when her mother was still alive, she used to speak Italian with her. Now my cousin only speaks it when she goes to an Italian restaurant, but that's not enough to maintain her full command of the language."

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  • 2 months ago

    i think they both sound good

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  • 2 months ago

    1.  The sentences are correct, but would be more clear if they were broken into 2 sentences.  As is they tend to run on and on .

    2.  Their meanings are generally the same, but the word 'command' does imply closer to complete knowledge and 'grasp' implies more of a minimum knowledge.

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  • 2 months ago

    There is not a big difference between the two versions: either is grammatically and contextually acceptable. I, as an American, would prefer the word "command," because "grasp" implies that she would lose her Italian language skills and "command" is a slightly stronger word.

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