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How long can I recharge an non rechargable battery until it becomes unsafe?

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  • Dale-E
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Alkaline batteries are very rechargeable. If you could recharge them in a freezer, they might make it out alive, OK. But normally they start leaking corrosive gas right away and will ruin stuff in short order in every ordinary usage.My answer per my experiences: Ordinary Alkaline are unsafe after even the first recharge cycle.

    What we used to use were Carbon-Zink and they were not rechargeable. The outer jacket was corroded to get electricity out of them and there was no way to un-corrode the zink jacket.

    I have never tried recharging a 3 volt Lithium button cell, like a 2032 for example. Any who have, please do tell.

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  • 1 month ago

    Less than one second.

    NEVER try to recharge a non-rechargeable battery.

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    • Dale-E
      Lv 7
      3 weeks agoReport

      Never Try, is an exaggeration. But those usually do eat up people's flashlight, especially if run till dead, or left in the heat, or charged too long or more than once. But a quick charge will give something if you started with nothing.

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  • 1 month ago

    Not very long. While you can get some power back in a cell the chemistry isn't totally reversible, so you get some gas generated which pops the seals and lets the electrolyte out. That corrodes the battery connectors and can rot plastic housings. So don't put a refilled battery in anything valuable!

    • Dale-E
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Truer words have never been spoken.

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  • 1 month ago

    I used to charge "regular" AA & D batteries all the time in the 1980s (all thebatteries for the Walkman and boombox). I only had one that expanded (didn't exploded) and leak the acid out. My grandpa bought me the charger and it could hold 4 D batteries.

    I don't know what current the charger used, but you should use a relatively low current to charge.

    But, I don't do it today basically because I can afford new batteries (and have some rechargeable). My guess is that today's alkaline batteries have better seals and such (which is probably won't gives them long shelf life) and so the risks are higher than when I was doing it.

    People do it. If you search for injuries or deaths from charging a non-rechargeable battery you don't find any results. (at least I don't when I google search)

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  • 1 month ago

    Force in high current like 2A with a bit higher voltage like 1.7V to charge any AA or AAA alkaline battery. It becomes hot in a few minutes even explode !

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  • Nancy
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Zero time.  Not at all. 

    From the start, the battery acid starts heating up, causing it to want to expand, building pressure inside the battery. As pressure builds, the battery acid can begin to seep out, which it is both very toxic and very acidic. If you get any on your skin, it will burn you and keep burning you until you find some way to neutralize the acid, and plain water won't work. You'll have to find something basic to mix into the water, like baking soda or Alka-Seltzer. Also, if you get any on your clothes, you will see a hole develop there within hours or a day. It will also permanently etch or mar counter tops and other surfaces.  And that's best-case scenario.

    Worst case scenario, which is extremely likely and happens all the time, the building heat and pressure of the battery acid in the battery will cause it to suddenly explode. Not only can whatever is around catch fire, a kind of fire that can't be put out with water, but also whatever is around will be bombarded with shrapnel and splashed with burning acid, leading to extreme injury to anyone standing nearby.

    A very common injury from people attempting to recharge nonrechargeable batteries is permanent blindness as people are often still looking down at the nonrechargeable batteries they are attempting to recharge, so when they explode, their eyes get doused with searing-hot battery acid and they instantly can't see to put together a solution to neutralize the acid and maybe save their eyes, if they even have the ingredients they need on hand in the first place.

    Batteries aren't that expensive, certainly not worth the immense risk. Either buy rechargeables or buy replacement nonrechareables, because trying to recharge a nonrechargeable is pure folly.

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    • DCM5150
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      put out with water no matter what caused the ignition. "A very common injury from people attempting to recharge non rechargeable batteries" - do you have a source for this because I can find anything.

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