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What do you think of advanced placement for first grade?

My daughter keeps showing signs of advanced intelligence.  She's four and will be five by fall and here if tested, she can start first grade.

She can count into the hundreds.  She can add numbers in her head up to 20.  Her language skills are amazing.  She's bilingual but that's not really a feat as we have a bilingual home.

My son did these things too but there's a difference.  We never taught her.  She's learned it by herself.  She actually likes to study.  She goes online, navigates the web to education sites...yes, she can read and navigate the web, then she'll just sit there and learn.

If we try to help her, she says no and wants to do it by herself.  She was always that way, even as a baby when she stacked blocks, she'd get angry if we tried to help her.

Don't get the wrong picture, she doesn't just sit there by herself, only when she's studying.  She's a sweet, friendly little girl.

I'm not asking this to brag.  It's a serious question.  Here's the thing.  Sure she's intellectually ready for first grade but is it better to just let her have another year of being a little kid without the drudgery of school.

My husband is completely against sending her even though a lot of people think we would.  He thinks not only is the drudgery bad for her but it will actually stifle her.  He says he thinks sending her will just slow her down.

Update:

He also says she's going to have a whole life of having to go to school, work etc. and just let her have at least one more year of being free.

10 Answers

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  • LizB
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    I think the academic challenges of school should match the child's ability, otherwise kids get bored. And when kids get bored, bad things happen. Some act out, disturb their classmates, and get labeled "problem kids." Then they get to high school and drop out, not because they're not smart enough, but because they've already had the label for years and school administrators have given up on them.

    OR if they're well-behaved, then they go another way which can be just as damaging. They get labeled "the smart kid" and become defined by how easily they breeze through academics, and come to be convinced that if school is easy, it's because they're "smart." But then they get to high school (or in some cases college) and are finally academically challenged the first time in their lives, then suddenly develop a MASSIVE case of imposter syndrome and become paralyzed and struggle to adapt. And that's because since school has always been too easy for them, they've had very little practice at failing or learning to overcome failure. Thus you wind up with bright young adults who drop out of college or earn subpar degrees, all because the self-doubt they develop becomes too overwhelming.

    So my opinion: if your child is bright, start her in school sooner. It will be GOOD for her to be intellectually and academically challenged, but more importantly, she has to learn how to break down problems and cope with frustration when things seem hard. It's not her brains that will really help her succeed in life, it's the skills she develops a getting accustomed to failure, learning how to overcome it, and keep going. Play is important for little kids, too, but it's not like she's in school 7 days a week.

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  • 1 month ago

    One of my friends had twins, a boy and a girl, born three weeks before one of our daughters. They are all now 27 years old.

    Her son is a certified genius - IQ around 160.  He started school at the age your daughter is now. Her daughter had some learning problems which masked her IQ, and she started a year later as did our daughter.  Our daughter was said to be gifted, and was on the old side for her class with a September birthday. 

    Academics came easily for her until a few classes in high school. Emotionally and socially, though, she was in the right place as an older child in her grade.

    The son of my friend barely made it through high school.  Although academics were easy, even though he was advanced another year later on, he was not socially and emotionally ready to be in those higher grades.  He is, today, a DJ - not quite the brilliant academic future she had envisioned for him, but he is very happy with his career.

    Her daughter the "non-gifted" one easily finished high school and went into Neurobiology.

    I'd wait to start your daughter. 

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    not at all in my opinion

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  • 1 month ago

    There are pros and cons to skipping grades; you need to take into account not only the academic ability of the child, but her social abilities as well. She will be surrounding by children who are older than she is and who have had a full year of schooling already. Personally, I don't agree with how schools push academics on young children and would be concerned with her having very developmentally inappropriate expectations on her. On the other hand, I know what it's like to be a student and be absolutely bored out of my mind because I would finish assignments way ahead of the rest of the class and then get in trouble for wandering around. It's certainly not serving a child to never challenge their thinking. I would probably start with looking into alternatives to public school personally, see if there's a good community school or option that doesn't stick kids in a cubby based strictly upon age. If you are able to, even doing a public online school and getting involved in a homeschooling community could be very beneficial for her... you and her father would be able to make sure she is getting an acceptable education while having the freedom to learn about what she would like to learn about and maybe find other kids who have the same interests.

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  • 1 month ago

    The problem is she will eventually come to a point where she is far less mature than her classmates, and that can cause a major problem for her. So be aware of that when you decide. Come 5th grade or so, it will be an issue.

    • Jenny
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      Well, that's patently wrong.  Homeschooled children are actually more mature.  Kids learn childish behavior from children. I see this with my son.  He's actually gotten less mature since starting school because he learns from other kids.

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  • 1 month ago

    No I wouldn't bother.

    Often kids with high intelligence are not developed enough socially and  emotionally to be with that age group.

    I would want her to gain social skills with kids her age and let her soar academically. 

    I would sign her up for kumon it's a math rich tutoring program to set skills for the future.

    When she is older, mature do some testing.

    Most public schools don't bother. 

    Good luck...she sound amazing.

    • Jenny
      Lv 6
      1 month agoReport

      She's actually quite mature.  And she doesn't miss a beat.  She is annoyed by immature behavior of other kids.  That's far more likely to be her social problem. 

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  • edward
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    My school doesn’t just accept anyone. Every kid that comes to my school has to be tested and interviewed when they register in Kindergarten. The school was focused on the kids being smarter (for the tuition alone they should be better) because they want to continue the stellar 100% university acceptance rating they have right now. Your daughter could go to a private school if you’re interested

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    • edward
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Okay.  I think she should be a kid for as long as possible.  There’s no reason to rush it

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Every parent is sure their kid is a genius.

  • 1 month ago

    She isn't even in the school system yet.  You would talk to THEM about placement, not random strangers online.  We have only your word to go on.  Educational professionals actually evaluate children.  But hey, if you want totally anecdotal and non-professional input, your husband is right. 

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    • Tri-Harder
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Okay.  Perhaps try re-posting your question to make it clear that what you're looking for is people to validate you and say your husband is wrong rather than give actual input and opinions.  

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  • 1 month ago

    I would let her spend another year at home just being a kid and continuing to learn on her own.

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