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Native English speakers, could you please help me with these issues?

Which is correct:

a) "Unlike English, in my native language there are now words ending WITH 'g',"

Or

b) "Unlike English, in my native language there are now words ending IN 'g',"

6 Answers

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    A) Unlike the English language, my native language does not have any words that end with the letter 'g'.

    B) Unlike the English language, in my native language, there are no words ending in 'g'.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Both of your choices are poor ways to say your thought.

    Unlike English, my native language has no words ending with "g".

    Simple.

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  • Gloria
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    a) is correct. there are "no" words ending WITH "g"

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  • 1 month ago

    You can say either, the "with" carries the idea of spelling but in carries the idea of speech (sounds; the g is part of the word rather than how you mark its end).  Usually both are true.  But that "carries the idea" part is not definitive.  It is not a rule that is strict.  It is just a general meaning.

    "with" means that the thing ends as soon as the "with" item appears.  The tour ends with lunch (when you get to lunch time, the tour is done).  the "in" idea includes the thing as part of the ending: the race ends in a 2 km oval track (the last part of the race is on a 2km oval).

    Usually, it does not make a huge difference whether you think of the marker as part of the item and use "in" or think of it as a special item of importance in itself and use "with".  The word "In" tends to be used for inclusion, to say that the thing that is in is part of the rest of the thing.  "with" is used to mean "this is of special importance", something that adds to the thing in some way.

    I took a tour in a group is not quite the same as I took the tour with a group, even if they basically mean the same thing.  In the first, you are part of the group and not separate from it, in the second, you can be part of the group but it is more important that there are others other than you in the tour (you do not have to be part of the group to accompany (be with) the group although you usually are).

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  • David
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Both are OK but change 'now' to 'no'

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  • 1 month ago

    Either one can be used.

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