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Democrats, would you vote for Bloomberg if he became the nominee in a contested convention if he bribed the superdelegates?

Not only a contested convention. But a contested convention where Bernie Sanders or maybe mayor Pete got the majority of normal delegates during the primaries but not enough but then Bloombergs money bribed the superdelegates for their votes sucuring his nomination. Would you vote for Bloomberg in the general election, not vote or vote for Trump?

6 Answers

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  • xg6
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I don't care who the nominee turn out to be, I'm voting Democratic in November 2020

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  • lare
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    there are not enough super delegates to take the nomination without having at least 1600 pledged delegates as well. To get 1600 pledged delegates, he will have to do better than Bernie in the primaries overall.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    I think you don't understand how the convention works. If a candidate, whether Bernie Sanders of Pete Buttigieg, gets the majority of the pledged delegates (what you're referring to as "normal" delegates) then they'd win the nomination.  A brokered convention would come in if no one gets a majority.  In that case someone would have a plurality of the delegates, IE, the most. 

    The role of the superdelegates is really misunderstood, at least in terms of how they've actually functioned.  What happens in the primary is that candidates are competing for "pledged delegates" to the Democratic convention.  Under the Democratic system the delegates are awarded close to proportional.  So, for example, Sanders and Buttigieg have each gotten about a quarter of the vote in the two contests so far, so they've gotten about a quarter of the delegates.  These delegates are known as "pledged delegates" because they are required to vote for their candidate, at least on the first ballot.  To get the nomination you need a majority of delegates to the convention. 

    The superdelegates are a collection of politicians and party officials who are free to vote for whomever they want, even on the first ballot.  Every Democratic Senator, Congressman, and Governor are superdelegates.  In addition, every former Democratic President and VP are superdelegates (so Biden will be a superdelegate at the convention and able to vote for himself, as will Senators Warren and Klobuchar, I'm not sure if Sanders will be because he only registered to run for President).  In addition, there are a bunch of state and national party officials who are superdelegates. 

    But the thing to understand is that the superdelegates have never voted against the candidate with the most delegates going into the convention.  It just doesn't happen.  Nor are there enough superdelegates to make an unpopular candidate the nominee.  At most the superdelegates would be able to make a relatively close second place finisher the nominee.  They're not going to vault someone from fifth or sixth place into the nomination.

    Furthermore, your specific scenario, where Bloomberg bribes people to get the nomination, simply isn't going to happen.  To start with, there are overm700 Superdelegates.  There's simply no way that you'll keep a secret among that large a group, and so it would come out.  Second, bribing a majority of superdelegates (some of them are ideologically committed to Sanders or other candidates) would be immensely expensive.  Third, the vast majority of these people would never agree to a bribe.  It's at least arguably illegal, and it would be career destroying.  As I said, most of the superdelegates are sitting Democratic politicians.  Even if we assume that these people are completely amoral, which they aren't, they've got career ambitions which would be derailed if they accepted a bribe to support Bloomberg.

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  • Tmess2
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Not happening.  If anybody gets a majority of pledged delegates, there is no way that Bloomberg would get the votes from the superdelegates. For the most part, the superdelegates (a mix of elected officials and hardcore activists) understand how taking the nomination from the candidate that clearly won the primaries would damage every candidate running on the Democratic ticket in November (including many of the superdelegates).   The superdelegates have never overruled the results of the primaries, unifying behind the apparent winner nine times out of nine.  While I am not saying that it is impossible for the superdelegates to do something different this time, it would take something more than merely thinking that the voters made a mistake.  E.g. something damaging coming out about a candidate or the candidate being hospitalized with a life-threatening condition. 

    Now if nobody is close to a majority and they only have a narrow lead among the pledged delegates (e.g. Sanders has 1500, Buttigieg has 1490, and the remaining 500+ pledged delegates are split between the rest of the field), then it is unpredictable what the super delegates would do.  That still would not give Bloomberg the nomination as he would still need to get the pledged delegates to support him.  So Bloomberg would need to be a close second to a candidate with a mere plurality to have any chance (and would still need to also get the delegates pledged to the candidates who finished far back).  After all it takes a majority of all delegates, not just a majority of superdelegates to get the nomination, and the superdelegates are about 16% of the total number of delegates.  So a candidate will need the support of at least 1600 pledged delegates to even have a chance at winning the nomination.

    Additionally, it would be hard for Bloomberg to successfully bribe the superdelegates.  You are talking 700+ individuals, and the odds of a successful conspiracy involving that many people is very slim.  Sanders was relatively successful in 2016 in getting his people elected to the DNC and the people elected to the DNC in 2016 are the largest part of the superdelegates for the 2020 convention.  If Bloomberg even attempted to bribe those people before the convention, it would be all over the news well before the second ballot.  In addition to the DNC members (some of whom are elected officials), most of the other superdelegates are elected officials -- Senators, Representatives, and Governors -- who have their own careers which would be put at risk if they got caught taking a bribe.  I am not sure that even Bloomberg has enough money to get AOC to support him at the convention, and (again) an unsuccessful offer would quickly become public news.  While nobody that I know of has been tracking the super delegates, my expectation is that Sanders would probably get about 150 superdelegate votes on the second ballot if the convention was completely up for grabs.  

    If the information came out after the convention, the DNC would remove Bloomberg from the ticket like a hot potato.  

    Now if Bloomberg does finish a close second and persuades the convention to support him, an unsupported disinformation rumor campaign from Trump's handlers alleging that the superdelegates were bribed would not be enough to influence my consideration of the candidates.  

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  • James
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I will vote for the Democrat in November, because I believe Chump is worse than any Democrat running.

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  • PoBoy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    No one is going to bribe anyone. Bernie and Warren combined to not poll 50%. Any honest result will not nominate Sanders.

    • Blue Diamond
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      Bernie doesn't have a chance, and not because the people aren't behind him, but the DNC won't have it,as in 2016- They'll never allow him as frontrunner-Clinton stole the victory from him last time & it's happening again- Bernie's complacent, it's ok w him, no complaints- he's a willing participant

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