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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in PetsDogs · 1 month ago

What would you do?

I just took on a 14 year old female Greyhound. This poor dog has has a terrible life, been in two shelters, the last allowed a drug addict couple to adopt her. The man was ok with her but his girlfriend was physically violent and was caught kicking, hitting and leaving her outside in the cold. She got reported so wanted to get rid of the dog quickly so my Mum took her and brought her to me (this woman lived near my Mum). She's got the most beautiful temperament and I was hoping to give her just a few months of a happy life. The vet said she had an inflamed bladder so was put in anti-inflammatories. Stage 3 heart murmur so given medication. She whines and is quite restless. Her mobility isn't good. She falls, is clumsy, staggers and can't get up without assistance but seems to enjoy a walk. She a bit underweight but eats and drinks well. She's slowly gaining her confidence, will sometimes play and enjoys getting chews. The vet thinks she likely only has a few months left to live. My question is: should I keep her alive and provide all the medicine she needs for a next few months and just spoil her or have her put to sleep now?

Vet checked for bladder infection and did an ultra sound. The murmur didn't causing any other complications yet or fluid. Sometimes she seems out of breath and panty. Other days she seems more lively. 

Update:

What signs should I look for that she's enjoying her life? I've fostered dogs before but never owned one so old.

Update 2:

Just spoke to my vet on the phone and she's provided me with something for anxiety and we've upped her anti-inflammatory. Her heart isn't too bad. Stage 3 with no fluid build-up (including around liver). Very few symptoms of any heart issues evident in her. She goes for a 5 minute walk 3 times a day because anything more affects her mobility. Also she's underweight so once she's built backup that might help. The vet has seen her twice in the last 3 weeks 

Update 3:

Ad although she thinks her time is limited she thinks her issues can be managed for that time. I have the time and the money to dedicate to her. Thank you everyone so much for your honest and helpful opinions. x

11 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Give her 110% of love, make her comfy - nice bed and brush her teeth.  Quite often, a heart murmur is caused by bacteria flowing from the mouth down the throat, where it goes straight to the heart.

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  • 1 month ago

    Is she in severe pain & suffering with it? Is she still mobil, is she happy & wagging tail? Does the quality of her life so bad she needs to be put down now?

    I am in a kinda alike issue. I have 16 yr old female Dalmatian that has advanced skin cancer & has all these horrible eruption of hugh lumps that open up & bleed like a son of a gun & just drips & drips. She is in pain but medicated for it. She still is very active but wants to chew & lick at her lumps & that just causes them to get worse. She wears a E-collar but she is still a happy dog & I have even seen her run a little bit. She is really bad off but not yet time to euthanize. Lots of work keeping up with all the sores & lumps, bandaging with compression bandages but she is still very much alive & active. Some think I should have her put down but she is too full of life to even think about it.

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  • 1 month ago

    As long as she is enjoying her life I would wait to have her put down.  I had a cat with kidney disease that lived for quite a while after being diagnosed and it was only until she was not eating and did not want to play that I decided to put her down.  The dog will let you know when it is time.  

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  • 1 month ago

    It's all about quality of life really.  With mine, I tend to go with when they stop eating although we've had some who ate up well, to the day we had to let them go.  I particuarly remember one with mammary cancer and we gave her peace as she was clearly increasingly in pain.  We never allowed 'lingering'.   When the down days started to outnumber the up days, we pretty much knew we had to do something.

    This is a difficult one as you haven't had long to get to know her.  If this were my decision, I'd have a chat with my vet who will offer things to help give her as good a quality of life as possible, if he can.   Once he has nothing more to offer, then it may be that letting her go would be a kindness.    When is the right time has usually been there, in their eyes.   They tended to tell me when life was too much of a burden.  Thankfully her final time on earth will be way better than what's gone before.  So well done for that.

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  • 1 month ago

    This is a really hard decision and only one that you can make with guidance from your vet.   

    I totally understand where you are at though as I take in oldies one after another for one of my 'spaces' in the house.  This means I'm often in this situation about when to call time.   

    She sounds like she has neurological issues as well bless her. 

    I sincerely hope she has a few lovely months with you before you have to make that awful decision but WELL DONE YOU for giving her time to enjoy life to some degree.  

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  • *****
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    In my opinion, if she is sometimes playing, enjoying her food, and likes walks, I'd continue to treat her medical conditions to keep her comfortable at this point. If she goes off food, loses more mobility such that she can't go for a bit of a walk, or is in obvious significant pain, then it's likely time to let her go. 

    You might see if the vet is willing to give you some pain medication to try, if not already taking some. My elderly dog was getting to be a bit grumpy, whiny, and restless, and starting him on some twice-daily pain medication really seemed to help him; they think he's just got some general old age related aches and pains. 

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  • 1 month ago

    Is she happy or is she in pain?

    If she is in pain, scared, cowered and fearful then you are being cruel prolonging her suffering.

    If she is painfree and seems to be enjoying life then continue .

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    it's entirely up to you but personally i would not take on this burden.i don't like to say she a burden but your just opening yourself up for alot of expenses and heartbreak.

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  • 1 month ago

    i would talk to your vet about all this and see what they say

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  • 1 month ago

    As long as she seems to be enjoying life, I would take care of her.  If she gets to where she seems miserable for more than a few days, I would put her to sleep. 

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