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Mikem M asked in EnvironmentGreen Living · 3 months ago

Solar Panel for Grid tie Inverter?

300W 500W or 1000W grid tie inverter.

I am interested in buying a 300w 500w or 1000W Grid tie inverter and since i am new to this, i need some help.My question is about the INPUT power (watts) of the solar panel. How do you choose one? Is a 100W / 200W or 250W solar panel still the same for the Grid tie inverter.If I choose a SP of 250W 18V or a SP of 100W 18V - Does the grid tie produce the same output, since all it cares is about the 18V DC input? I do not see any information about this anywhere. For a 1000W Grid tie, do I need an array of 1000W SP 18V ? I really cannot understand thisThe only information I found is that for a 1000 GTI, a 280W SP (30V) is too low.Thanks a lot.

6 Answers

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  • 3 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    If you want to do that yourself, just keep in mind that you'll be handling deadly voltages at every part of the system.

    Ok, back to your question. You want to run a 1000W grid tie inverter. In order to deliver 1000W to the grid, such an inverter will need something like 1050 to 1100 Watts at its input. And usually (at least those that I have on my roof) the panels will be wired in series in order to give 100...300 Volts at the input of the inverter. At 18V input, you'd need to rate that cabling for 60 Amps - quite apart from the problem that, if you parallel the panels, the panels that get more sun will feed their power into the panels that get less sun instead of the inverter unless you also use decoupling diodes.

    Putting all the panels in series may give you a different problem, though - the panels and their wiring will also be rated for a maximum voltage, which will limit the amount of panels you can safely put in series. So you'll have to read the manuals for the inverter and the panels carefully.

    Of course, your inverter can be rated for a larger power than the panels can deliver. No technical problem there - but a larger inverter may also have larger (absolute) losses, so using a 50 Watt panel to power the 1000 Watt inverter could mean you'll never get any power out of it, since all the power produced by the panel is used up in the inverter itself.

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  • 3 months ago

    austrlia has the dumbset people in the in the world the who gods knw why came to the dumbest country the whole coutry is rubbish dumb 

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  • arther
    Lv 5
    3 months ago

    will a grid tie work in stand alone mode with out the grid if that matters to you?

    you want closer 5 kw . 

    Solar array open circuit voltage closer to 360 volts 

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  • Mr. P
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    You have to look at the spec of the inverter and the panels. You need to specify an inverter that can handle the maximum load in the best possible conditions. Fortunately panel manufacturers tent to overhype their panels so a 100W panel will not likely put out a full 100W - ever.

     The next thing to look at is the output voltage swing from the panels and the input voltage range of the inverter. Usually the panels are connected in series and parallel, so you may have 3x 100W panels in series, and 3 rows in parallel giving 9 panels total.

    If possible seek advice as there are some extra regulations regarding hook-up because you need to be able to isolate the system if anyone is working in the fuse panel. One of which is a sign saying how the system is connected and how to isolate it.

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  • 3 months ago

    Many panels have the inverters built into them now so if one panel is shaded a bit it doesn't affect all the other panels. You'd probably be better asking someone who knows instead of the Yahoos on here.

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  • Dze
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    basically, you want the inverter to be rated high enough to handle the total max watts of your array . . input voltage is variable and the inverter needs to be rated to handle the voltage you decide on making the system ...again generally, panels are seriesed to run a higher voltage with less amp load, 48v for example .. but you can run less of course, you could run a 100w panel on a 1000w inverter, your not going to harvest much though .. typi ally youll get roughly half the rated wattage out of a panel on average .. my opinion is a grid tie system that will actually make a dent in power usage around the home needs to be 2500w+

    • Mikem M3 months agoReport

      Thanks for your reply. So in your opinion, in order to harvest the 1000W as rated on the Grid tie, how many panels of W should the set up be?

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