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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 2 months ago

Why syllables in A-mer-i-ca divided this way, and not like A-me-ri-ca?

7 Answers

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  • RP
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    One reason may be that the "i" is pronounced like the "i" in "it" and this form of syllabification ensures it is not pronounced like "ee" as in free.

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  • D50
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    I would syllabize it the second way. Shouldn't an Italian word by syllabized in the Italian way?

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  • blank
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Ready to go "super old school"??   

    Once taught to break any word into syllabic subcomponents by putting the back of your hand just under your chin:  as you say the word, every time your chin hits your hand - a new syllable starts.   This works for me every time (but then again, so does an abacus).

    A-me-ri-ca  

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  • 2 months ago

    In fact, the general rule is that a syllable should start with a consonant, if possible. So I would write:

    A - me - ri - ca. 

    But if I were showing how to PRONOUNCE it, I'd type:

    Ah - MEH - rick - ah.

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  • Nick
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    the second should be right in Italian, Usa has different rules

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    All languages are based on sound. To the native ear, it's A mer i ca. To a second language, it sounds different.

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  • 2 months ago

    Because that’s not how syllables work. There’s not really a better answer than that.

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