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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Home & GardenCleaning & Laundry · 3 months ago

do vinegar & alcohol kill germs much better than "Dish Soap"? why people don't use those items more than "Dish soap"?

what is "Dish Soap" really? how does it kill germs or not? it mainly is to make things LOOK CLEAN or to kill germs? why, when "Dish Soap" became popular? why?

Update:

did people USE TO use alcohol or vinegar to clean anything from a counter or table, to dishes, glasses, what about carpet or floors or anything, toilet bowls, etc?

when did all these varieties of "Soap" come on the market and how they clean better or not than alcohol or vinegar?

9 Answers

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  • elhigh
    Lv 7
    3 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Do they kill better: no. In fact pure alcohol isn't as effective at killing germs than diluted alcohol.

    You can reduce your exposure to live germs two ways: you can kill them, or you can remove them. Dish detergent is VERY effective at removing the germs, and so-called antibacterial dish detergents are no more effective at removing them than the non-antibac products. Worse, most antibac products require a certain amount of dwell time in which they remain on the surface to provide the level of antibacterial action that they claim - but typical users neither know nor follow that practice. So what they are doing is using their antibac product as if it were a conventional product, but paying extra for the ingredients whose benefits they do not allow to take effect.

    In practice the antibac products have been proven, time and time again, to be no more effective at reducing bacterial populations on surfaces than conventional ones. The cheap detergent is every bit as protective as the expensive antibac one.

    '

    Knowing that, why would you bother to ever pay extra money for antibacterial products?

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    In the case of Covid 19, the dishsoap or bar soap dissolves the outer casing on the virus which kills it.  Sort of like how soap is the best thing to use to get grease off dishes.

    It works against this Germ.  That is what they have found out.

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    to bottom comment-why do you think so?

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  • 3 months ago

    Vinegar does not kill germs. 

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  • Ann
    Lv 7
    3 months ago

    To effectively kill germs in your dishwater, use a little bleach in the soapy water.  Then rinse in hot water with vinegar.  This was recommended by a dr. here in Dallas (TX), when we had some cases of Ebola back in 2017.

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  • 3 months ago

    Not only does dish detergent help get rid of bacteria but it also removes food and grease residue that can harbor bacteria. Alcohol and vinegar doesn't do as good a job as a detergent does.

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  • 3 months ago

    DISH soap is for DISHES

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  • Anonymous
    3 months ago

    Dish soap creates a strong solution. A strong solution kills bacteria by osmosis. Once you grasp that principle you will realise that any strong solution can be used to clean items. But dish soap also degreases and is biodegradable which makes it ideal for the job.

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    • Lv 4
      3 months agoReport

      ANY strong solution kills by osmosis. Sugar, vinegar, detergent in water.

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  • 3 months ago

    Soap doesn't kill germs, at least dish soap doesn't. There may be soaps with special ingredients that kill germs, but what soap usually does is make it possible for water to rinse germs away. People have been using soap for millennia. What we now usually call 'dish soap' is actually detergent, not soap, and was invented around the first world war. Before it was around and even after, people used real soap, and washing soda. Soap removes grease and oil

    Yes, people used to use vinegar to clean things. Not usually dishes. I'm not sure about alcohol. Putting vinegar or alcohol in the dish water wouldn't clean much grease off dishes.

    • Lv 4
      3 months agoReport

      Osmosis kills bacteria. Where were you in applied science class at school?

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