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Who does a deductible get paid to? And when? In a MVA.?

I was recently in a MVA (Motor vehicle accident) and my front end collided with another car ect... the other car fled the scene of the accident. After all that. I filed my claim and my repairs are currently just under 3,500. I have a 1,000 dollar deductible. From my understanding. My insurance is covering everything beyound my deductible. I'm only responsible for paying the 1,000. I'm a new driver as well. So I'm just wondering who my deductible is paid too and kinda how everything works. I think the deductible is paid to the shop that fixes my car directly if I'm right? Also does my insurance send me a check for the other bit passed my deductible or do they pay it directly to the shop? I have progressive car insurance and am using one of their network shops for repairs. Thanks. Any information is helpful for me to better understand what happens. Btw... damages weren't that bad at all. Dont see how it was 3,500 the hood just had dings and few dents and just needed a new bumper and grill and shock absorber (the foam padding I assume) that broke. 

9 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    You pay the shop.  Insurance pays the shop for the rest.  You never see a check.  Just the shop.

    • Billy2 months agoReport

      Thank you for your answers.

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  • Edna
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    You don't  exactly PAY the deducible to anybody, and certainly not to the repair shop. Your insurance company deducts the deductible amount you agreed to when you bought your policy from the amount they're going to pay to repair your damage BEFORE they ever cut you a check.

     

    Example: You have a $1000 deductible. It's going to cost a total of $3500 to repair your car. Your insurance company will cut you a check for $2500. ($3500, less your $1000 deductible).  

    If it's going to cost $3500 to repair your car, that means you're going to have to come up $1000 out of your own pocket to pay the repair  shop if you want your car repaired.

    A majority of drivers carry a $500 deductible. Ask your insurance company to lower that $1000 deductible to $500, and save yourself some out-of-pocket expense in the future. A high deductible might save you a few bucks in your monthly premiums and a $500 deductible might cost you a few extra bucks in monthly premiums, but it's sure easier to come up with $500 out-of-pocket than it is $1000.   

    • Billy2 months agoReport

      Thanks. Yeah my insurance is paid for in full for a year. When it's ready to re new I'll be looking at paying a lower deductible. 

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  • zipper
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    The deductible is what the insurance does not cover, and YOU have to pay it to who ever fixes your vehicle. That is up to you!

    • Billy2 months agoReport

      Thanks.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It all goes to the shop. You pay the shop & so does the insurance. Let them do the work first. They show you the old parts, by law. Tell them  you want genuine FORD (or whatever) parts. Inspect your car. Make sure the car looks like new.

    The insurance company can't recommend a shop, but if you ask if they know of a good shop, they may say so.

    • Billy2 months agoReport

      Thanks.

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  • 2 months ago

    So, your bill is $3,500. You pay $1,000 to the repair shop and insurance covers the rest and your rates may go up. Since the shop is in you insurance company's network, the insurance company pays the shop directly.

    When it is all said and done, the insurance company is required to answer all of these questions. It's what you pay them for.

    • Billy2 months agoReport

      Thanks.

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  • 2 months ago

    Actually, nobody pays the deductible, technically speaking.  But in reality, you pay it.

    The deductible is that part of the damage not covered by your policy, in your case $1,000.  If the damage is $3,500 (which is chump change these days), your policy 'deducts' a grand and pays out $2,500 to the repair shop.  

    The repair shop doesn't really care who pays the total bill, as long as it gets paid.  And the insurance company doesn't care who covers the deductible, as long as it's not them.  That leaves you.

    Or does it?  Maybe the owner of the shop will cut you a deal and swallow some of the deductible.  Maybe your sweet old grandpa will step in and offer to cover part of it, just to be nice.  Maybe you know a Mafia don who owes you a favour.  I'm just throwing maybes around here, but you get the idea.

    But you're right, it's probably just you.  And you pay it to the repair shop before they hand you your keys.  But nobody would blame you for asking.

    • Billy2 months agoReport

      Thanks.

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  • Scott
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    It usually gets paid to the repair facility.

    • Billy2 months agoReport

      Thanks

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  • 2 months ago

    You pay the shop. Sometimes, you pay only the deductible to the shop and the insurance pays the rest to the shop. Sometimes, the insurance pays you and you pay the entire bill (the deductible plus what the insurance pays) to the shop.

    • Billy2 months agoReport

      Thanks.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    The repair costs $3500.  The insurance company will give you a check for $2500.  You are responsible for the remaining $1000.  You give $3500 to the repair shop when they are done fixing the car.  Your insurance company might also give the $2500 directly to the repair shop and the shop will bill you $1000 when the repairs are done.

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