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If iodine protects against cancer from radioactivity, would iodized salt protect generally from cancer?

Update:

Iodine like that in iodized salt, protects against a host of medical conditions but, not cancer?

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  • Andy C
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    The levels of iodine that are toxic to cancerous cells are also toxic to YOU cells.

    Eat iodized salt as it is one of the only sources of iodine available today. You need it, but just a little.

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  • Not at all in my opinion

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  • 2 months ago

    You've misunderstood how Iodine is used to avoid cancer.

    1) Iodine is absorbed by the thyroid gland and accumulates there

    2) After a nuclear explosion, radioactive iodine is produced

    3) Radioactive iodine is taken in by the thyroid gland which can eventually lead to thyroid cancer

    4) By taking a large dose of regular Iodine before or soon after a nuclear explosion, that Iodine is taken in by the thyroid gland so that it's 'full' and the radioactive Iodine isn't absorbed.

    So, the cancer protection is very specific to thyroid cancer due to a release of radioactive Iodine. It offers no protection to the thyroid or other forms of cancer at other times.

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  • 2 months ago

    iodized salt is crap. I recommend the iodine cure by Dr. Brownstein 

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  • LAN
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Wow!  So much stupid assumptions and misconceptions.

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    • LAN
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Not when all you are really doing is posting mindless idiocy that you can't be bothered to look up even the most basic information on

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  • 2 months ago

    Please read all the wiki in future. No, iodine does not give general cancer protection. It is used so that your body does not absorb the radioactive iodine released in a radiation accident. Your thyroid loves iodine, and can't tell if it's radioactive, so you fill it up with the non radioactive kind before you get exposed to the radioactive sort. Strangely, the treatment for thyroid cancer, can be radioactive iodine.

  • 2 months ago

    the way that iodine protects is this 

    the thyroid uses iodine but the thyroid can't tell between radioactive iodine and good iodine 

    if your body has plenty of iodine when it is exposed to radioactive iodine it will not absorb it because it doesn't need it 

    if you are deficient in iodine your body will absorb the bad iodine because it can't tell the difference 

    when my husband went for xrays I gave him  iodine so he would not need to absorb any radioactive iodine 

    I think iodine has a part to play in keeping cancer at bay yes 

    I have a pinch of organic seakelp on my toast every morning

     iodised salt is ok but a pinch of organic seakelp would be even better - don't overdo it  

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    Iodine deficiency causes a host of conditions, which is probably why iodine is in salt.

    It's unlikely that salt has enough iodine to affect radiation poisoning, or cellular damage by radiation.

    For definitive information, see source.

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    • ?
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      Obviously the dosages for combatting cancers connected to radiation and combatting goiters is different.

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  • Lili
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Iodine protects against thyroid problems in general (that's why we need it) and may have some effect (though that's disputed) against thyroid cancer from radioactivity. It does not protect against other forms of cancer.

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