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Engine wear and oil consumption at higher rpm?

Does driving at higher RPM cause more engine wear?

Let me give an example:

Two cars with 200,000 miles on each. Same make, model, year and configuration.

Both are gasoline engines. Both were driven mostly on highway. However:

Car1 - was driven mostly at 3000 RPM or less on a highway at speed of about 60-65 mph.

Car2 - was driven mostly at 5000 RPM (but never in the red zone) at higher speeds (German Autobahn has no speed limit).

Question: Is it conceivable to conclude that Car2 is more likely to have more engine wear, higher oil consumtion and overall worse engine "health" than Car1?

10 Answers

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  • CB
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    The answer is YES that is a good assumption because the pistons have traveled more time up and down the cylinders and the crank has spun more times, and the valves have been activated more times resulting in 40% more wear and tear.

    • Name Withheld
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      NO - identical cars with the same final drive ratio, driven the same total miles have accumulated the same number of revs and same piston travel, and same valve activation......one has just done it faster.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Car 2 will have traveled farther so more engine wear occurs.  Autobahn - 120MPH is average. So the pistons have gone up and down the cylinders TWICE AS OFTEN= MORE WEAR.  But you say both have the same mileage.   Then Car 2 has been parked for a month(with engine turned off) waiting for Car 1 to achieve the same mileage.

    Same mileage= same wear.

    Use your gf as an example...

    .a Your piston pokes her once a week slow and easy.

    .b Your piston pokes her once a day for a quickie

    .c The football team gets to poke her for that day.

     For a to =c means c is going to be resting for a long time with no action before a catches up in the wear category(getting that many thrusts)

    You got to compare Apples to Apples.

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  • M.
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Probably.......

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  • PANKO
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    The most wear comes right after start up. The lubrication hasn't started yet. A full synthetic, for that reason & heat, is very important. A motor oil turns black because it's cooked. Higher RPM's means higher heat. Keep your oil changed.

    • fuzzy
      Lv 6
      2 months agoReport

      The black is NOT from heat but carbon collected by the oil (Unless you've really really really abused the engine)

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  • 2 months ago

    The higher RPM motor will have more wear probably because of higher temperatures and lubrication not being as good at high RPMs.

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  • 2 months ago

    the biggest factor is type of oil used ..and good service schedules ...BMW  a few years ago ran a car non stop for 1.000.000 miles ..a million miles ..it run on MOBIL1 fully synthetic oil ..apart from fuel and service schedules ...after a million miles the engine was stripped ..95% of engine parts could have been put back on shelf and resold ..i have run all my motors on same oil ..never ever had a failure ..even through wear ...200.000 miles is not a lot of miles these days ...your average taxi will do 500.000 miles ..ADD its not true there are no speed limits on german autobahn ...i got nicked for speeding on it!

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  • 2 months ago

    Well, I guess the question could be extended to:

    Am I taking better care of my engine if I do not drive the car at higher speeds/rpm or it doesn't really matter.

    • arther
      Lv 4
      2 months agoReport

      do you not root your wife to save her for the next bloke. If the motor cant take it buy a tuffer car, 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Car2 could be in theory in worse condition than Car1.  A used oil analysis taken at about the same interval of both cars will be a quick indicator (although not reliable) which engines are in worse condition.  But at 200k miles, it does not really matter.  Both engines are near the end of its service life.  A smart move would be to sell or trade the car while it still has some value left. 

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  • 2 months ago

    If a car is consuming oil as you put it then it is due to wear which is allowing oil to be burned where it is not supposed to be in the first place.

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  • 2 months ago

    The history of an engine does matter,

    but not at any one given moment.

    Far more factors than those you enumerate have to be considered,

    and the only way to really know the condition of an engine

    is to tear it down and inspect its internals.

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