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  • Anonymous
    1 week ago
    Favorite Answer

    Liberals see a government not giving them full power so they want that government to radically change to secure that power to them. 

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  • Anonymous
    1 week ago

    To say that "Democrats" want to abolish those things is misleading.  With the exception of the Electoral College, you're not going to find widespread support for these things.  Saying that "Democrats" want to abolish them is like saying that Republicans want to abolish Social Security, birthright citizenship, and the CIA.  You can find some Republican somewhere who has argued for each of those things.  But they don't represent the party. 

    As for the electoral college, the argument is pretty simple:  Twice now, in a short period of time, we've had the losing candidate in a presidential election, ie the one who the people rejected at the polls, being elevated to president because of the electoral college.  That's a terrible outcome.  On the flip side, the electoral college serves no positive function in America.  Given this, we should abolish it. 

    I'd go out on a limb and say that, effectively, there's no Democrats who want to abolish the Senate or Supreme Court.  Both play an important role in America.  But reforms to the Court would be good.  There's a number of good ideas out there.  One is to enlarge the size of the court.  This would reduce the importance of any one justice and would limit the possibility of their idiosyncracies impacting decisions.  Another is to eliminate lifetime tenure and instead go to something like a twenty year term.  This would prevent justices from serving for extended periods of time and reduce the influence of the "dead hand of the past" on ongoing political issues.  It would also allow for more fresh blood to get into the court and would reduce the likelihood of Justices becoming isolated from the real world consequences of their actions.  Furthermore a shortened term would reduce the problem of happenstance in shaping the court.  A candidate winning a certain election by chance, or a Justice dying randomly, wouldn't have impacts which reverberate down for decades and decades.  This would, among other things, hopefully reduce the intensity of political feelings around a nomination contest since the stakes would be lowered.  Ideally, IMO, the best reform would be to have justices serve a limited term, say twenty years, but to have their terms staggered so that two Justices are appointed in each four year term.  This would routinize the appointment of justices and allow fresher perspectives to enter into it, reducing the possibility of the court becoming out of touch with the current political situation.  It would also serve to turn down the heat surrounding nominations, because if you didn't get a nominee this time you'd know that you'd always have a chance next term. 

    The idea of abolishing the Senate also has essentially no support.  There are certainly problems with the Senate.  One of the big ones is that equal representation for states with different populations means that states representing something like a quarter of the US population could theoretically form a majority.  The realities of partisan distribution mean that this extreme result hasn't happened.  But you do get results such as we saw the other week when the Senators who voted to impeach Trump represented significantly more of the American populace than those who voted to acquit him.  But there's no real solution to this problem other than a complete revamping of the institution, a drastic measure which no one supports.

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  • James
    Lv 7
    1 week ago

    They suppress the voice of the people.

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  • 1 week ago

    Did you not bother to read the links ? They each make a good case for their positions, and you have offered NOTHING that could even start to attempt to refute any of their points.

    Conservatives: We know nothing, we are nothing, and we offer... NOTHING.

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  • Anonymous
    1 week ago

    Because these things, (and the 1st and 2nd amendments), are stumbling blocks to the socialist state they'd like to create.

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  • 1 week ago

    The electoral college is prone to abuse, as evidenced by two out of our three presidents this century taking office without gaining the consent of the governed through votes. 

    The Red senate just needs to be voted out and replaced, and they’ve seen to that themselves. 

    The Supreme Court will balance itself out over time, once republicans free themselves of Mitch McConnell and remember what integrity means. A year and a half that shameless hack blocked any constitutionally mandated confirmation hearing to “let the voters decide”. Too bad he doesn’t feel the same way about elections. 

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