Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 1 week ago

Why did the Soviet Union loose so many soldiers in WW2?

22 Answers

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  • 7 days ago

    "lose"       .

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  • 1 week ago

    A few years prior to German invasion Stalin purged thousands of experienced officers from the army. The invasion took him by surprise and initially he tried to coordinate strategy himself instead of relying on his generals.  

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  • Anonymous
    1 week ago

    Usually because of Stalin's pretty bad leadership.  I also laugh when Russians and Georgians say how great he was as a leader.

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  • Anonymous
    1 week ago

    Because Stalin didn't think Hitler would attack the Soviet Union and did not prepare for a full scale invasion.

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  • .
    Lv 6
    1 week ago

    Because Stalin didn't think Hitler would attack the Soviet Union and did not prepare for a full scale invasion.

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  • 1 week ago

    First, you have to understand that the animosity between Germans and Russians was deeply rooted in both their national consciousness.  As you have seen exhibited in actions between the English and Irish, Japanese and Chinese and in just about every conflict in the Middle East, the level of brutality tends to be proportional to number of centuries of ill will between cultures.

    Besides the sheer brutality of the fighting, the Russians tended to see their army as a "hammer" designed to pound the enemy as a massed collective, with very little regard for the lives of individual soldiers.

    A good illustration of this was depicted in a movie called "Enemy at the Gates."  The film's opening scenes, set during the Battle of Stalingrad, shows raw Red Army recruits crossing the Volga by the boatload and being thrown directly into massed charges against heavily-armed German positions.

    As they disembark from the boats, only one out of every two men is given a rifle.  The other is told to charge alongside one of the armed men and wait for him to be killed, at which point he may have that man's rifle.  The ferocity of the forward charge is maintained by officers whose job it is not to kill Germans, but to shoot any of their own men who retreat.

    Quite simply, one of the main reasons they lost so many men is because that was actually a key part of their strategy to defeat Germany.  Stalin knew he had the advantage in sheer numbers, so he just kept throwing those numbers against the Germans knowing that he could lose twice the men and still win.

    • Michele K
      Lv 4
      1 week agoReport

      It was not deeply rooted. I can name several wars when Russians and Germans fought together aganst other enemies.

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  • 1 week ago

    Underfunded, no training, few weapons and the war there happened in the middle of the winter.

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  • 1 week ago

    Initially, because they lacked weapons and ammunition in sufficient numbers and what they had was not particularly advanced compared to the tanks, heavy equipment or the airforce that Germany still possessed. But that all changed during the Battle of Stalingrad in 1939. A battle that according to WWII historians was a turning point of the war in Europe.

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  • Anonymous
    1 week ago

    The German army killed them

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  • 1 week ago

    The Germans had a very potent military and the Soviet Union's political system had little respect for the rights of individuals and just sent them into the slaughter en masse.  It was the combination of desperation and the fact that they could.

    P.S. - I'm not trying to justify what the Germans did, just trying to answer the question.  Both sides did terrible things.

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