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Ye asked in PetsHorses · 2 months ago

Why do people think I have a high horse?

It doesn't make sense to me. It's not like I have the money to buy a horse. I mean, I did do horseback riding lessons once upon a time, but I don't do it anymore. Please help me understand what these people mean!

Update:

I just realized that they might mean my horse is high, like, on drugs or something. Can someone verify?

5 Answers

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  • 2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Dismount thine elevated equestrian at once.

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  • Snezzy
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    As others have said, it is a figure of speech. I'm going to push for a bit more precision or elucidation here. When people tell me to get off my high horse, it usually means that my correct facts or my correct use of language offends them. I have the unfortunate tendency to be correct on all sorts of things, especially science, mathematics and horses. Only my dear wife (who started riding at the age of 8) is more correct about any of those.

    Those people want me to stop pretending that I know better than they do, but unfortunately I actually DO know better. It's a bit of a dilemma. Usually, when I can, I shut up and walk away, leaving them bereft of the benefit of my brains

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    The expression "come off your high horse" or "get off your high horse" is a figure of speech, Ye. If someone says that to you, what they are telling you is that they don't like your attitude, and that you need to humble yourself and address them on THEIR level, rather than your own. It also means that they are calling you a snob or an elitist, someone who thinks that he/she is too holier than thou to associate with everyone else.

    This expression has nothing to do with any actual horse, or its state of health. It's a figure of speech, and nothing more. Other variations on this phrase include "come down to Earth", "get over yourself/selves" etc.

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  • 2 months ago

    It's an idiom. It means they are calling you a snob and that you look down on people. Usually when people use the phrase they also mean it in the context that the person they are applying it to doesn't have the right to be so self righteous or judgy. It's not a good thing to be called.

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  • 2 months ago

    They could be saying "Get off your high horse" which is a SAYING that means:

    To stop acting as if one is better than other people; to stop being arrogant or snobbish. 

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