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Arthur asked in TravelAsia PacificJapan · 2 months ago

What do the cards spade, clover, diamond, and heart mean in Japanese?

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  • Quinn
    Lv 6
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    The modern western play cards and the suits have the same meaning everywhere including Japan. However, those are not the only kinds of playing cards in Japan.

    There are mainly 3 different kinds of playing cards in Japan: 

    1) Those originating from ancient China

    2) Modern western playing cards.

    3) Those developed by Japanese from the combined influences of Japanese, Chinese, and Portuguese playing cards. The cards the Portuguese introduced to Japan in the 16th century is different from modern western playing cards which are of French origin. 

    You might be interested in learning about all the different kinds of cards and games/tournaments the Japanese have for them. One of my favorite and current  interest is the Hyakunin Isshu Karuta. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HtT0I9Kxpg

    Youtube thumbnail

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I would often think of that as a child.

    Heart is Love, diamond diamond, or money, rich, spade unlucky I don't know why, clover didn't have meaning for me, but now peace or something.

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  • 2 months ago

    What do you really mean by that? Generally, those 4 symbols mean the same with English.

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  • 2 months ago

    Are you asking what they are called? Certainly they use similar cards with those symbols for the playing of western games. I don't know what they call them - I would suspect they use fairly literal translations of heart, diamond and spade. In the US, we call the other suit "clubs". 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    They...don't. Most playing cards in Japan don't even use those suits, and they wouldn't have any particular significance even if they did.

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