How come the light from a distant star doesn't warp and dissipate going through the vast pace?

When I see a star, its possible for it to be millions of light years away. But how is my visual image of the star so crisp?

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  • 5 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Photons will travel until they're either reflected or absorbed; If there's nothing interrupting the light from a star that you see in the sky, then it will arrive in basically the same 'condition' that it started in. The biggest obstacle that light may face is our atmosphere - the last 100 miles of a many-light years-long journey. 

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  • 5 months ago

    The light does dissipate. Its intensity drops with the square of the distance. I don't know how light could warp. 

    Stars we see in the sky are not millions of light years away. They are a few hundred light years away. That is still very far, but a star is very bright. 

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Space is an almost total vacuum so there's nothing to dissipate it.  And you can't see a star millions of light years away without a telescope.  You also have no idea what crisp is because all you see is a dot.

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  • 5 months ago

    Because there's very little between you and the star.

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  • Fred
    Lv 5
    5 months ago

    The large unaided stars you see in the night sky are, on an astronomical scale, very close.  Not only are they in our Milky Way Galaxy, they are in same spiral arm as our Earth's solar system. These range into distances of 60,000 light years away.

    Our local group which includes near by, in astronomical terms, Andromeda, our nearest large galaxy neighbor at 290 million light years away. Andromeda is a unaided eye object... If you know where to look under dark skies!

    To an unaided eye, Andromeda, looks like a smudge. However mere binoculars brings out more form. 

    Why doesn't the light distort threw the vast distances of space?  .. because there is nothing in the vastness of space!  Most of the distortion is caused by our own Earth's atmosphere!

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  • Dixon
    Lv 7
    5 months ago

    Space is very empty

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  • 5 months ago

    If it goes through an atmosphere it is far from crisp.

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