Native English speakers, could you please help me with these issues?

Consider the following sentence:

"That will PULL your attention AWAY from the appointment."

1. Does this mean as:

"That will DRAW your attention AWAY from the appointment."

Or

"That will pull DEVIATE attention AWAY from the appointment."

2. And which of all is more standard?

5 Answers

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  • Dave
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    'pull' is somewhat synonymous with 'draw', for certain collocations. But 'draw s.by's attention' (to or away or back, or whatever else of several possible adverbials) is really the older standard phrase; it uses 'draw'. (I am unsure how old a verb 'pull' is, but 'draw' is *really* ancient in the English language.) So, to me, 'draw...' sounds better as an almost-set phrase here, just as 'to draw a conclusion' sounds better. Those just go together as a set-phrase, and to 'pull a conclusion' just doesn't work... 

    Source(s): native AmE
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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    1. Both.

    2. Neither.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    The first two are about the same.  "Deviate" attention is not the same and is usually not used that way.  The first one is probably more commonly used.

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  • Anonymous
    3 weeks ago

    None of them are standard. Try this:

    "That will deflect attention away from the appointment."

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  • 3 weeks ago

    Yes, and they're all equally standard, it's just that 1a and 1b sound a lot more natural.

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