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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkCooking & Recipes · 2 months ago

How to get my meats to have that "restaurant" taste?

This seems like a straightforward question and the immediate answer I anticipate would be to heavily season/salt the meat. I mainly work with ground beef and bacon and I'm trying to figure out how to get rid of that 'gamey' taste. Bacon ordered at a restaurant is both crisp and savory, with a fatty flavor. When I try to cook bacon, I have to undercook it to get that savory/fatty taste. If I cook it so that it is crispy, it ends up have a strong pork flavor, similar to fried pork rinds, which I find unpleasant. Similar with ground beef, cooking it to welldone gives it a strong unsavory beefy aftertaste. What am I doing wrong? Is the meat spending too much time in the freezer?  

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  • 2 months ago

    Buy ground round or get a meat grinder and grind up round or sirloin.then you don't have to make it well done. Flavor it with rosemary, lemon pepper, seasoned salt a touch of thyme and cut a piece of the steak fat and use an iron skillet turning the temperature on high and sear it on both sides then turn the temperature down and cook it only a few minutes. You can make a sauce with caramelized onions and and sliced mushrooms. Let the meat sit a few minutes because it continues to cook then serve immediately. Since you are using steak it is safe to cook it medium or medium rake. Cooking meat well done kills the flavor. .

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  • 2 months ago

    There are lots of hidden ingredients when you order food at a restaurant that one wouldn't normally think are there.  Steaks for example are often thrown onto a grill for a few minutes per side for the markings then placed into a skillet topped with butter and finished off in an oven.  This gives them that rich flavor that is sometimes difficult to recreate at home.  Plus the cuts are sometimes more expensive ones than one might purchase for themselves at a store.  Brining and marinating your beef could help as well.  Fat = flavor which is why food at restaurants often tastes better.  It's riddled with hidden fat to make it better.  As for the bacon, you have to spend a little more to get better quality and cook it low and slow.  I either bake mine or microwave it which sounds a little ridiculous but it comes out perfectly.

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  • 2 months ago

    I finally gave up on thin-sliced bargain bacon and started buying thick cut. I don't fry it, I bake it. Lay it out single piece deep on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Pre-heat oven to 350° and start checking it at 13 minutes. Keep it in the oven until you have the desired crispness (probably about 15 minutes, but oven temperatures vary). As to beef, even ground beef tastes best cooked to 135°. If it's not "beefy" enough, add a tablespoon per pound of Tones or Better thaqn Boulion beef base to the raw meat.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    It's probably the quality of the meat. You could make your own bacon.

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  • 2 months ago

    Aside from the obvious things like a lifetime of practice, sometimes college degrees on the topic, high-quality, fresh ingredients, etc, the biggest thing I think most people don't know about it that it's technically leftovers.

    A few things like steak and sushi is made just for you but nobody is roasting a chicken leg for 45 mins just for you. They purposefully undercook it the day before so it will be fully cooked when they throw it on the grill for you for 5 mins. Two theories abound on why restaurant food tastes better (and the only speculative one is the exhaust from the delivery truck).

    One is that is marinades or brines by proxy. The flavor agents sink in sometimes more than overnight vs when you just sprinkle it on top 30 seconds before cooking. Another is more psychological. A study shows people will claim to like brand name bottled water when they can see the bottle. When given blank cups, they tend to actually prefer New York City tap water over any bottled water. The implication is expectation. You expect it to be good so you judge it as such even when it might not be, and vice versa for your home food too.

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  • 2 months ago

    Try baking the bacon, and you may want to try organic beef, grass fed, as there’s a distinct difference. Storing your meat in the freezer beyond a few weeks’ time will affect flavor, too.

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  • 2 months ago

    You probably need to find a different kind of bacon. They don't all taste the same. I don't know about the ground beef, since I don't use it.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Bacon that's been frozen isn't the same. If you're going to eat it as bacon, rather than as an ingredient in something else you need fresh bacon of the correct type.

    I know that ground beef (or mince as we call it in the UK) can be frozen but I never do it. Although I'll freeze things made from mince such as burgers and meat balls.

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  • 2 months ago

    It may be that, but more likely it is the result of freezing it in the first place. Freezing in a refrigerator is not the same as freezing done commercially. Because the process is slower it causes cells in the meat to actually rupture which most certainly will affect not only the taste but the texture of the meat. Restaurants don't freeze their meats and tend to buy high-quality cuts of meat. Try using lower fat content ground beef and use some unsalted butter when you brown it. As far as the bacon is concerned it may be that you are using too high a temperature and/or cooking it for too long. When the bacon is completely rippled by the heat and no more fat is visible remove it from the pan and drain on a plate with paper towels to soak up the fat. If you have to make several batches, drain out the fat and wipe out the pan before starting the next one. Leaving the small pieces of bacon or the fat will only make the additional batches to have a burned taste.

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  • Petter
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    There's probably a huge difference in meat quality here. The meat should not spend ANY time in ANY freezer.

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