Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 4 weeks ago

How across evolution, did our bodies learn that if there is a problem, they have to find a way to fix it?

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  • Paul
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Obviously the evolution of our brain, which gives us the intelligence to devise such methods of "fixing" some of our problems.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    By a very wasteful, cruel and uncaring process

    of trial and error,

    with the errors suffering an early

    and probably painful death.

    --

    Regards,

    John Popelish

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Our bodies don't learn.

    Never happened.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    The study of genome sequencing in living species, begun in the 1980s, seemed to show lots of 'junk DNA'. This 98% of the total DNA in advanced organisms (to 80% in bacteria) was taken as clear evidence of evolution. It was said to be rubbish left over from failed evolutionary 'experiments'. When automated DNA sequencing techniques became available during the 2000s and it became possible to sequence entire genomes, including the massive, so-called junk ingredient, some curious things were noticed. First came the unwelcome surprise that humans had only 25,000 to 30,000 genes - compared with a similar number in a small plant called Arabidopsis and over 40,000 in rice and poplar trees. It is a bit humbling to think that a city full of human beings has a smaller gene pool than a paddy field. 

    We also now know that humans share 96 per cent of their DNA with chimpanzees (it used to be claimed as 98 per cent). What this proves, of course, is not that chimps are 96 per cent human, any more than rice is 133 percent human, but that genes and sequences as such are by no means the whole story. It is becoming increasingly clear that much if not most of the story resides in the junk DNA. 

    As Science Daily points out: [quote] Most of the big differences between human and chimpanzee DNA lie in regions that do not code for genes, according to a new study. Instead, they may contain DNA sequences that control how gene-coding regions are activated and read. [unquote]  The word 'junk' has now been junked, and this apparently redundant DNA is now referred to as 'non-coding DNA'... A new class of tiny piRNAs has been discovered and it now seems that they DO contain control codes that govern such things as gene expression, foetal development and much more. Only the tip of the iceberg has been looked at. But as all DNA comes from the one Source, who knows how to tweak it for critical differences between different species, we should not be surprised at many similarities. [All the above is extracted as quotes from 'Who Made God? Searching for a theory of everything' by Prof. Edgar Andrews, pp 234-237 The Mighty Mutation (EP Books 2009)]

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  • 4 weeks ago

    I figure that the earliest life form survived long enough to propagate itself and pass on the survival instinct, by going to where safety and resources are.  

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Adapt or die. The ones that had the right characteristics lived to evolve.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    One celled organisms have that ability.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    That started as soon as the first cell arose. Failure to fix any injury resulted in extinction.

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  • Jake
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    By reciting the rosary every day with care and sincerity, a person can know numerous truths about God, creation and evolution.

  • 4 weeks ago

    By dying and not producing any offspring.

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