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Are landlords allowed to give "blanket" notices to enter a premise?

I live in Northern KY (Covington). My landlord will send an email out on a Friday saying they will be entering my home for a quarterly inspection of the home the next week. They give a timeline of Mon-Fri between the hours of 9 a.m. and 12 p.m. but do not give a specific day, just that it will be sometime during the week. Are there any laws around this? As a renter do you have the right to ask for a specific time and date?

16 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    So which of the 3 questions do you want answered?

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  • zipper
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

     Yes they can. But you have the right to demand a set day for the visit, you do have a life!

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      You may REQUEST a set day, assuming you have some specific and valid reason they should try to work around your schedule.

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  • 2 months ago

    No. All that is required is 'reasonable advance notice'. Some states do not specify a precise number of hours and some do, but where it is not specified, common law holds that 24 hours is reasonable.

    With proper advance notice, your presence is not required. The landlord or their authorized agent may enter with their key. You may be there if you want to be there, but you cannot legally refuse them entry.

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  • Bort
    Lv 6
    2 months ago

    I'm not sure if KY is one of them but in some state and local laws a landlord is required to give at least 24 hours notice of entry if they're planning to enter. They did that. They're within the law. They don't have to give a specific date and time.

    What are you afraid of? Have you caused damage? Fix it.

    Is the place a mess? That's not usually a violation and it's also not what they're allowed to check for legally unless cleanliness is in the lease agreement. They're checking for safety and structural things. Making sure the place is safe and everything is working that's supposed to be by law:

    Electricity, plumbing and heating, fire / smoke / carbon monoxide monitors and alarms and making sure there aren't any structural leaks causing weather or water damage they need to fix.

    It's not a problem or illegal for you to reply with a reasonable request of making it a specific time and date so their entry fits around your work schedule. No law states that the tenant must be present during inspection. The landlord owns the property so they have the right to enter and inspect.

    Look up your state laws and see if there's any local laws pertaining to landlord entry.

    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      Not all states allow the landlord the right "to enter and inspect." They may need consent of the tenant in some states, such as in NH.

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  • John
    Lv 4
    2 months ago

    Actually you don't have to let anyone in your rental landlord included. Its a curtousity thing on your part.

    You can reply denying entrance.

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    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      2 months agoReport

      If you happen to be present and don't want them to come in, you can deny entry and chain the door shut or block it with furniture.  The next sound you may hear is the landlord attaching a notice of termination to your door, with a 3-day cure or quit demand, after which you can be evicted.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Yes they have given proper notice for entry. There isn’t a law around it. The give a blanket notice because things can come up to delay it happening. You can call and request a date and time for the inspection. Many will work with you on it but others will not.  

    Source(s): Have done then frequently for the past 6 1/2 years as I work maintenance for several large complexes
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  • 2 months ago

    I think this is kinda a gray area. The landlord has a right to inspect the premises and has to give 2 days notice (in Kentucky its 2 days) but you have a right to privacy and the landlord can't just give you notice to enter anytime in the next month, for example.  

    Anyhow I looked up the exact statute and there didn't appear to be anything stating exactly how specific to notice was required to be, just a vague statement that the landlord and tenant should agree on a specific time (but not that it was required). There was also a statement that the time should be doing normal business hours unless agreed to otherwise (which is the case with this notice).

    So, without any specific law saying otherwise, and with the landlord giving a decently small window of when they'll be there, I think this is ok. Not ideal, but not violating any laws that I can find. So, I think you will have to allow him to enter whenever he comes duing these times. You could still call and request a time or tell him Friday is bad, or whatever.

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  • 2 months ago

    Thats legal...sorry. 

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    "As a renter do you have the right to ask for a specific time and date?"

    There are fifteen possible hours they may come.    That's pretty specific considering there are 2184 hours in the quarter.

    Yes they can do that.

    Yes you can ask for an even MORE specific date/time, but they do not have to comply.

    Bottom line is that you've been given notice that they are going to enter.  There visit will not be a surprise, which is the entire purpose of them being required to give notice.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Perfectly legal. You can ask but they don't have to .

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