How long do you think you can last?

Lets assume the power grid goes down and we have no electrical power and it does not come back on.   So how long do you think you will last?   Water?  Are you on a well or city water?   Is it pumped by a windmill or electric pumps?   How much water do you have stored?   Food?   All the freezers and coolers at the store shut down so you got maybe a week of ice cream, etc.   The will be a run on the stores so what you have now may be all that you have.  How long will your food supply last?    People are going to come looking for food and water,  if you got it,  do you have the means to defend it?  Or are without means of protection and they are going to get what they want?

Got a backup generator?   What does it run on?  How long will your fuel supply last?   How do you heat your house? Got a fire place,  how much wood do you have?   Have you been using a gas chain saw to cut down trees and a gas powered log splitter to turn it into fire wood?   How are you with a saw and ax?    So,  How long do you think you can survive if the power is forever gone?  

12 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    Back in 2005 when Hurricane Katrina decimated Louisiana and the governor there decided not to get any federal help, which left people literally fending for themselves, I witnessed the Mass Mayhem that followed.

    Because it became quite evident that the government is not capable handling a small crisis, I can't imagine with the state of the United States would be like if the power grid went down forever. Howsoever, watching the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and how it led to desperate people doing desperate things, I got to thinking about what I needed to do in event of emergency.

    I think I can survive on my own for about a month. At which point, I will probably save one last bullet for myself. In all honesty, I've had a great life and raised two wonderful children. My job here is done and I wouldn't want to live in a world of desperation.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Not long as gas furnaces and oil furnaces rely of electricity to turn on the furnace gas valve. and then the blower motor. In the winter when it is -20C.  The freezer works fine.  I just put the food on my enclosed veranda. Got no fireplace so am kind of hooped.  Water is gravity fed so that is forever.  Beer taste good cold or colder.  But you know how business is.  The electrical company is a business and they make money by selling electricity (or no money for no service) so they are interested in making money.  So they do their best to keep the grid up.  They make huge profits off of it.

    Remember, not everyone lives in California.  That is not the center of the world.  Mordor is.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Most cities and towns have back up generators to keep the water flowing. 

       I have a back up pump for my sump that is powered by city water.

        When the 2004 blackout in eastern us and canada occurred water was not issue.

         

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  • 4 weeks ago

    With my son and his family; a long time.

    He has knowledge, just like you to SURVIVE.

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  • elhigh
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    You do realize, don't you, that grid electricity has only been a thing for the last hundred years or so, right?

    And the human race goes back more than a hundred years.

    In fact there were lots of places in the US that didn't get power until the 30s, the "national grid" was, up until that time, a bunch of little grids huddling close around cities.

    So, to answer the question:

    My little town's water is provided by a tower, gravity fed.  Its capacity is suitable for about a week and a half.  After that, there are at least three springs a short drive from me whose quality I trust, and one of those is walking distance.

    Food: there would be a binge while I ate up the ice cream.  It wouldn't last a week, don't be stupid.  It would last a day at the most.

    Frozen food would be immediately cooked up and canned in jars.  I have spare jars.  I also have firewood and plenty of white gas for my camp stove, so cooking is absolutely not a problem.  The white gas will be held in reserve for summer; there's no point firing up the camp stove while the wood stove is already hot.  I've cooked on it before.

    Over the last few years anytime butter went below $3 per pound, I'd buy extra.  So I have about 20 pounds of butter in my freezer.  The way to make butter last without refrigeration is easy though: soften it and mix in more salt.  It becomes room temperature stable with extra salt.

    Do I have extra salt?  Yes, I do, many pounds of it and I know where there are easy reserves of more.  And did you consider how long you might survive without salt?  I bet you didn't.

    It's January, and winter in the northern hemisphere so I gain a bit of breathing room there.  Move the refrigerator outside, and crack its door open during the night.  It'll stay pretty cool.  That will let me stretch out my adaptation over a few days if necessary.

    Do I have means to defend it: not really, but I'm going to change my lifestyle, not hoard supplies.

    How much wood: plenty.  I daresay I know better how much wood it takes to get through a winter than you do.

    How am I with a saw and axe: I own half stakes in a gas powered log splitter, which I leave with my father in law who is 85 and owns the other half.  I use a splitting maul and wedges, and can split about a quarter-cord per day without pushing myself.  It's easy to do.

    I have an entire library full of books in my home, a dozen different crafts and their related supplies, a wood shop full of hand tools, and a couple of bicycles.  Just up the street, there's the town library with even more books.  So if the internet goes away, big deal.  My time can be filled with other pursuits, and not just with trying to survive.  Surviving won't be hard.

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  • Bob
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    forever, it would be like camping. there are filters that make lake or creek water drinkable. A hunting rifle and fishing tackle could get you food to eat, electricity isn't required to survive. having a big tank of propane would be helpful. yes, it's important to have basic tools like axes, knives and saws. 

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  • Barry
    Lv 4
    4 weeks ago

    How did people manage to exist before electricity was discovered? Also we can generate our own electricity with banks of Leclanche cells. Enough to run lighting.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    That happens all the time where I live here in Alaska. On top of power failures, we have the very real possibility of a major earthquake occurring at any time that could completely shut down roads, airports, and railways.

    I always stock at least one month's supply of food, water, fuel, and prescription medication. However, heat could be a problem in the middle of winter when temperatures can reach -60°F.

    Just about every electronic device in my home is plugged into backup power supplies that give me at least 4 to 8 hours of continuous runtime. Here, frozen and refrigerated foods can safely be stored outside about 7 months out of the year because of the cold temps.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    There is something called a car.  You gas up and leave and go to a place where there is power.

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    • Nuff Sed
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      If you don't have is already filled up every day, or a standby supply to top it off, shame on you.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    That's why you have a bunker with ration

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