How can an employee take an ethical stand regarding a business decision when his or her superior already has taken a different position?

11 Answers

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  • 3 weeks ago

    That employee has no standing to clam any business decision is unethical or ethical provided it breaks no laws. Claiming you employer is unethical might get you fired (legally) but if the employer finds an employer's decisions unacceptable their only option is to quit.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    The bottom line is that you can't as long as you like being employed there.

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  • 3 weeks ago

    The bottom line is that your supervisor is the superior and therefore has the last say. In the end, the supervisor is responsible for his or her decisions. If your supervisor has made a decision that eventually has a negative outcome, he will have to answer to that.

    Although you may see things in a different light, it is irrelevant as the supervisor has the last say.

    The only recourse that you may have is to resign from your job if you find what your supervisor did was too egregious for you too carry on with the company.

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  • Judith
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    You are hired to do a job.  If you don't want to do something then quit.  Otherwise do what you are told to do.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    They can cite the reason in their resignation.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    They can quit if they like.

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  • y
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Can't really, What you do is pull the boss over privately and voice your concerns. Then take it from there.

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  • Nancy
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    By voicing where they stand to their superior. If their superior disagrees, then then the employee must decide whether to "blow the whistle" by going over that superior's head to his or her boss or by contacting HR, which HR departments are required to provide both a means for blowing the whistle and protection to whistleblowers. Also, if the business is beholden to an organization that imposes ethical standards, like the state bar, for example, or the AMA, for another example, then the employee can contact that organization. Finally, if what you are calling "unethical" rises to the level of being illegal, then you can contact an appropriate law enforcement agency, like if your employer is unethically breaking OSHA's safety regulations and not ensuring a safe workplace, which is also against the law, you can contact OSHA, which is a law enforcement agency with the authority to enforce workplace safety laws.

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  • Susie
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    A business decision?  If you have a close, open, or friendly relationship with your boss, you can say “Do you mind if I offer an opinion on this?”  Especially if you have an idea that might work better.    If you don’t, then you should  keep your opinions  to yourself. 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    You can either live with the superior's decision or get a different job.

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