Just build a PC today. Gaming now and it drops frames every 10 or so seconds. Specs in details. Looking for where I went wrong ?

AMD Ryzen 1200 

GTX 1650 

16 GB Ram. 

Installed graphics driver when built. 

Motherboard came with disk to install drivers however I don’t have a disk drive so those drivers are not installed. That may be why? If so where should I go for those drivers. 

4 Answers

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  • VP
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    If you really "just built a PC today" then congratulations -- and I'd advise you to do 2 things:

    1. Download all of the Win 10-compatible drivers recommended by the various manufacturers of your hardware -- from their websites.

    2. Run Window's "Update & Security" function 900 times (manually) until your maintenance level has caught up. The current maint level is 1909.

    After doing all of that you'll know 2 things:

    a. Your PC is caught up with maintenance and you're ready to retest and troubleshoot any issues you find.

    b. You're too tired to do any gaming today.

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  • Dick
    Lv 7
    3 weeks ago

    It may be that your CPU may be a bit overloaded depending on what or how much software you've installed. The following is a bit lengthy but it may solve your problem. It involves "programs running in the background" and how to turn them off. <<<<< Slow Computer – Everybody tends to blame the slowness of their computer on the hardware such as the CPU, the HDD or SSD. Generally speaking the slowness you’re realizing is caused by you. Here’s how it happens. In the majority of cases, when you install a new program on your computer it will also install an execute file (.exe) in the Startup routine or as many call it, the boot up routine. Some programs will ask you if you want to include the software in the start up process but many don’t. Most people simply say “yes” and with that another program in going to not only be launched in the “back ground” but will continue running as long as your computer is turned on. These small chunks of software simply keep their associated programs at the ready to launch if you double click on the associated icon, such as Word, Excel, your web browser, etc.

    Here’s how to allow them to be installed and then turn them off. Why would you want to do this? Well, for example Microsoft Office used to run in the background all of the time. Updates to that software have changed that but in that example, why would you want MS Word, Excel, etc. running in the background when it’s not actually being used. Generally speaking, you can turn off everything but your security programs, such as antivirus software.

    Here’s how to turn of the vast majority of programs “running in the background”.

    (1) Right click in an open area of your Task Bar. (2) In the list that appears, left click on Task Manager. (3) Near the top of the window that appears, left click on the Startup tab. (4) Now look at the list and select the programs you want to turn off as follows. Look in the column titled Status. To see if the item is Enabled, or Disabled. If it’s enabled and you’d like to stop it from booting up, simple left click on that line once and the line will be highlighted in blue. Now look down at the lower right hand corner of that window, and click on the Disable button once. The status column will reflect that it is now disabled. Do this to all items you wish to stop from booting up. (5) If at some point you wish to allow a program you’ve disabled to be in the Startup routine, simply redo the above process, and when you look in the lower right hand corner of the window, simply click on Enable. The software will then be back in the Startup routine. >>>>>

    Hope this helps!!!

    Source(s): 33 Years Computer Experience & IT Support
    • Andrew3 weeks agoReport

      I will do this. Thank you

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  • 3 weeks ago

    So you went to the motherboard manufacturer's website and downloaded the LAN, SATA, and Audio drivers?

    With AMD's Ryzen processors and motherboards, you really should download the chipset drivers from AMD's website.

    https://www.amd.com/en/support

    Once the chipset drivers have been installed, you will need to go into 'Power Options' for Windows 10 and set the Power Plan to either Ryzen Balanced or High Performance for the Ryzen CPU's.

    I would suggest benchmarking your PC to see if it's performing the way it should be. I suppose you can use the Final Fantasy XV benchmark and Userbenchmark.

    I would suggest monitoring the CPU and GPU usage while gaming. Quad-Core processors without Simultaneous Multi-Threading are becoming long in the tooth for gaming. You might have to edit the Graphics quality settings to make it more favorable towards your hardware.

  • 3 weeks ago

    take it to a computer place and have them help you

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