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Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 2 months ago

If an object entered our atmosphere but fell in a remote location, would we know about it?

I was wondering; if an object from outer space entered the Earth's atmosphere but crashed somewhere with no people around, say the ocean or in the middle of the desert, would we know about it? Is there equipment out there keeping tabs on what crashes into the Earth? 

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  • 2 months ago

    Happens all the time and nobody aware. Bigger objects can spike seismometers.

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  • Joseph
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The US Air Force maintains a constellation of Defense Support Program satellites in geosynchronous orbit that monitor the Earth for missile launches and nuclear explosions.  These satellites have also detected meteorites entering Earth's atmosphere.  As the DSP satellite age they are being replaced by the Space-Based Infrared System.  These satellites can also detect large objects entering the atmosphere.

      

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  • 2 months ago

    Yes we might, if the object shows up on radar, civilian or military, people see and report the streak of light, it is photo grapes by a security,dashboard or other camera, explodes in the atmosphere like the Chelyabinsk in February 2013 exploded, or it impacts or any large fragments impact the ground at high enough speed to set off one or more seismometers or seismographs.

    Earth's atmosphere and surface and even underground are under constant surveillance. Earth's gets 30,000 to 100,000 metric tons of stuff falling onto it from space every year

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    The effects would certainly be noticed on seismometers.

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  • 2 months ago

    I am not sure of the threshold of the Seismographs. If the object was large enough and struck land the impact would be recorded and located.

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  • 2 months ago

    Yes, there are all kinds of cameras in orbit looking down at the Earth.  An impact anywhere on the ground would be detected as it was happening.

    An impact in the ocean would also be detected by the tsunamis it would produce.

    Please note, those statements are all referring to objects that are large enough to do some damage.  Smaller objects could land without being noticed.

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  • 2 months ago

    It depends on how big the object is. A very big meteor hitting the ocean would cause a tidal wave. If it hit solid ground, it would cause fires and earthquakes. But a rock the size of a marble would not do anything. It would make a bright steak of light in the sky, but that is about all.

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  • Nyx
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Daily, Earth takes in around 100 tons of space debris. The vast majority of that falls sight unseen (oceans, daylight, people not bothering to look).

    And most of the debris is sand grain sized to a meter in size. All of that gets turned into so much dust high up in the atmosphere.

    The bigger stuff can be seen on ground radar, weather, and military surveillance satellites - but that depends on location, and just sheer luck. And the really big stuff - the kind that sometimes makes it into the lower atmosphere, and makes a sonic boom, can be picked up on infrasonic listening devices that are scattered around the globe.

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  • Goerge
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    We are tracking some asteroids but as far as down here is concerned I think not because we can lose airplanes like the Malaysian airline.

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