promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted

Native English speakers, could you please help me with these issues?

Consider the following sentence:

"French lawyer Henri Thulliez, revealed that the PPLAAF had received the documents that gave rise to the investigation into Isabel dos Santos’ fortune in late 2018, early 2019 – a time when the Portuguese whistleblower was still AT LIBERTY in Budapest, Hungary ."

1. Would the sentence be correct, and mean the same if it was written as:

"French lawyer Henri Thulliez, revealed that the PPLAAF had received the documents that gave rise to the investigation into Isabel dos Santos’ fortune in late 2018, early 2019 – a time when the Portuguese whistleblower was still IN FREEDOM in Budapest, Hungary ."

2. And which is more formal:

a) "in liberty"

or

b) "in freedom"

3 Answers

Relevance
  • Dave
    Lv 7
    2 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    'at liberty' is a set phrase in English, almost a cliche of two words only, if you will. ... Use that one. You can work around this by using the word 'free' in a different sentence structure but you wind up with many more words (something like "free and wandering around in Budapest..."). Finally, 'at large' is also a third possibility, but that one has more of a legal or police sense to it than 'at liberty' has, and none of these has the exact connotations of the other two. 

    Source(s): native AmE
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    The original passage is correct except for the comma after Thulliez, which should be removed. 

    Neither "in freedom" nor "in liberty" is correct in this context. 

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 2 months ago

    Yes that’s correct and I think I’m Liberty is more formal

    Source(s): Native English
    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.