Why do the past tense of some words just add “ed” while some past tenses just change the word?

For example, the past tense of scream is screamed and the past tense of run is ran, why is it not runned? 

Or the past tense for drink is drunk/drank but why can’t we say dranked? 

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  • 4 weeks ago

      artifact of mixing of UK english, norman french,,other latin lingos

    past years,

    I passed many years in grotoland

    in years past grotoland was somewhat warmer than usual

     which is an adjective?

    which is past tense?

    see?

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  • 1 month ago

    It is basically a historic artifact of the development of the language. Without going into a lot of detail, the precursor languages to English had different ways to form the different forms of a verb conjugation.  The irregular verbs in English tend to be very old verbs (very common verbs) that came into existence when the primary way to create different verb forms was through vowel shift (drink/drank/drunk or is was were).  Later on, the method become a consonant change (the commonly used suffixes -ed/en/t).  These reflect a different language origin.  There is a continual drive in English to see the regularization of even irregular verbs, so perhaps some day all but a few verbs will follow the -ing/-ed rule for creation of participles.  It is very unlikely that the verbs to be and to have, which are used allt he time as auxiliaries, will ever regularize, but words such as to dive are changing.  People tend to use dived instead of dove, for example.

    Irregularity is just an artifact of how the language developed. Most languages possess such things if they have developed from the influx of numerous language groups through time.  It is the rare language that is still as it was millennia ago.

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  • 1 month ago

    English is a funny language.

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  • 1 month ago

    Many more verbs were irregular in Middle English. They have tended to regularize- to take the-ed ending- over time. That's especially true of verbs that aren't used as often as others. That's why the most frequently used verbs such as come, go, eat, have, drink, etc. have stayed irregular. Some verbs are in the middle of the process of regularizing. If you look up "dive", most dictionaries will tell you that you can use either "dove" or "dived" as the past tense. Eventually, only "dived" will be used. 

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  • 1 month ago

    There isn't really any good short answer to this. Let's say it mostly has to do with the origin of the verb in question, with what language it originated in. If you really want to know, wikipedia has a pretty good article on English irregular verbs. It would be drinked, not dranked.

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  • 1 month ago

    Because some verbs are regular verbs and some verbs are irregular verbs. Irregular verbs do not follow normal rules for conjugation. The 'ed' verbs are regular verbs.

    https://www.englishpage.com/irregularverbs/irregul...

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