I acted nervous for no reason, was it noticeable?

At work, I have a responsibility of closing and counting the register. I noticed that it calculated on our system a different number than the drawer amount. 

The deposit was 5 dollars short of what the system calculated. My boss asked me about this today and I told him that we were not short in the register, there were just two different numbers on the system and calculator. He kept staring at me and asked me wouldn't the register be short then? I said no that the register was set appropriately.

He kept kind of looking down and staring at me too so I started to feel nervous even though I had no reason to be. Everything was fine on my end but I felt that there was a possibility I could get in trouble. My voice kind of got nervous and I think he noticed this. He then said okay. Afterwards, he seemed to talk to me in a normal way.

Does my boss think I'm lying now because I sounded nervous?

10 Answers

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  • 4 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    Your boss is good at his job.  He didn't understand why the discrepancy did not indicate a shortage at the register,  He asked, you answered.  He still did not understand, but he trusts your judgement so he said that it was okay with him.  For him $5.00 is not worth the fuss.

    I would have asked why you chose the  register count over the system calculation, too.  

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  • Pearl
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    i would hope he dont think youre lying

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  • 4 weeks ago

    when the drawer doesn't match up with what the computer says--it is short.  I am guessing security will be all over you (without you knowing it) for the next month.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Another work related story.  What are the odds?

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Maybe.  When you are short on your register there is an assumption of theft because machines don't lie but people do, so a supervisor may look for guilty behavior.  Your nervousness might have looked guilty, but on the other hand your confidence that you weren't at fault would be apparent too.  The trick to get someone to reveal their dishonesty is to glare at them and say nothing.  The person being glared at will then give off body language of lying, or become overly defensive.  The best response is to say nothing and stare back at them forcing them to speak next or end their presence.  Regardless, it really doesn't matter considering the small amount and the isolated incident that it was, so you really shouldn't give it a second thought.  Good Luck.

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  • Cara
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    You said to the boss that everything was all right, but didn't properly explain the reason. A five-dollar discrepancy is of course minor, but it shouldn't happen, so he's probably not too worried but will remember if it happens again. Of course we don't know if he thought you were nervous. 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    If he has a half-a-brain, he'd realize that you're not going to risk your job over 5 bucks and it was probably just an error in making change. If someone put a 5 dollar bill in the 1 dollar slot, it can happen real fast.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Please explain why you imagine we would have any idea what your boss things, given that we've never met either of you and that we weren't there to see this dramatic incident.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    I'm a bit confused like your boss. From what you say, the system says you should have X dollars, and the drawer/deposit had X-5 dollars. So your boss is wondering why you are saying that the drawer shouldn't be short 5 dollars. 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    No, your boss said "okay" and moved on.

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