Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsOutdoor RecreationHunting · 4 weeks ago

What does the extra .000s signify in round caliber; .50 vs .500 Nitro?

All around, why is the .300 Win mag not called the .3? etc.

9 Answers

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  • david
    Lv 5
    3 weeks ago

    Because the caliber is simply the bullet diameter, and the differences between those has to do with the weight of the bullet and the shape, size and power contained inside the shell, which can vary a lot.  They have to distinguish them somehow. The .500 is available in heavier bullets and with higher velocities than the .50 so the .500 is more powerful in general.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Makes sense. I knew a fighter pilot who flew Wildcats. Said the Japaneese used Zeros. Any time they added a Zero, they got stronger.....

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  • Mr.357
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    It is just a name.  Typically the first two digits have to do with the bullet diameter (not always correct) and anything else is just advertising.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Don't listen to these other guys they have no idea what they're talking about. The more zero's you add the more powerful it is. Example, US 30 caliber is less powerful than 300 Winchester magnum because they added an extra zero. Another example is 400 Corbon is more powerful than 40 S&W because of that extra zero. 50AE is less powerful than 500 S&W Magnum simply because they added a zero. The list goes on and on. Try it yourself, add an extra zero to the speed you're going in your car, 10 is less than 100 MPH right? It works with everything. 10 pounds is less than 100 pounds just because of that extra zero.

    Source(s): The zero is more powerful than people think it is.
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  • Robin
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    because the english designations are always in thousands of an inch and dont always bear a resembalance to the actual bore size. eg 303 = 312. 44 = 429

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  • 4 weeks ago

    You try to ensure rounds do not get mixed up. As an example, there is the 222 Remington and the 222 Remington Magnum and the 223 Remington. Easy to mix them up. There were already a bunch of 30 caliber rounds out there so they added another zero. Same with 50 caliber. The key point is make sure you have the right ammo no matter what they call it.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    In machining, in the US and other places that use the imperial system, dimensions are most often called out to thousandths of an inch. The diameter of the bore is therefore expressed that way. The shorthand version with only two digits, to tenths, comes from earlier days when measuring to thousandths wasn't something that could easily be achieved; old-timey gun bores would only have been measured to two decimal places and the nomenclature is still in use, even in contemporary calibers such as the .40S&W.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Pretty much nothing.   It is just part of the name they decided to officially identify  the cartridge with.  It which may or may not correlate with actual measurements of the cartridge or the gun that shoots it. Sometimes it might be to distinguish it from a similar caliber.

    As an example the .30-06 springfield and .308 winchester can use the exact same bullet (of course the case is different between the two).  In the case of .30-06, the .30 refers to the diameter of the rifle bore and 06 is the year it was invented.  For the .308, it refers to the max diameter of the bullet.

    Likewise the .38 special and .357 magnum can also use the same bullet.  The .38 is the diameter of the cylinder the cartridge gets loaded in, where as the .357 is the diameter of the bullet.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    The signify nothing, but which sounds better? "I have a 3 caliber rifle" or "I have a 300 Magnum"? Just like naming anything else, the maker gets to make up the name.

    When speaking of a 50, this is pretty much considered to be a .50 BMG by people that care about such things. Smith and Wesson naming their pistol cartridge a 500 immediately tells us that this is not the .50 BMG we are talking about.

    And of course the number doesn't always mean what we think it means. Case in point, the .38 Special. You would think this means it has a diameter of .38 inches. It does not, it is .357 inches in diameter.

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