Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 5 months ago

Why do schools cater to the lowest common denominator? Instead of helping the highest achieving students?

The lowest of the low are going to fail anyways, no matter how much you help them, and by helping them and lowing education standards, it just hurts everyone else, and it hurts the highest achieving students the most.

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    Liberal thinking unfortunately. The liberal way of thinking is to reward and prioritize the weak and punish the strong. Many liberals disregard the role of heritability in school performance and in intelligence and think students can be made equal by prioritizing the underperformers and "level the playing field."

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  • 5 months ago

    There are already numerous benefits for high achieving students (scholarships, more likely to get letters of recommendation from teachers for college, advanced placement classes, the opportunity to graduate early, etc.). 

    The supposed "lowest of the low" aren't always kids who just don't feel like doing anything or don't try. The kid who's absent a lot might have a sick family member that needs extensive care, or they might need to get a job to help cover expenses. Or they themselves could be chronically ill and can rarely handle being a school environment. 

    Some kids act out or don't try because they aren't challenged enough, sure. But what good will come of having the overall literacy of young adults decrease? I fail to see how overachievers are being hurt when they aren't the ones who need help.

    "They're gonna fail anyway" is a nasty mentality to have. Believe it or not, kids respond well to encouragement, and badly to jabs like "you're gonna fail anyway" and "you're the lowest of the low, and you're holding everyone back".

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  • 5 months ago

    Tell me about it. My girls were in AP classes throughout their schooling (my son was too busy always being suspended but consistently tested very well) and it's always been a mystery to me that we don't have aptitude testing early on upon which we can then base each child's education.

    Sort of like an IEP for every student, I guess?

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  • 5 months ago

    Because two of the main points of school systems are to keep the idiots penned up during their high crime years and make them marginally employable.

    Smart, motivated kids aren't going to end up on welfare or in prison.

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  • 5 months ago

    Schools actually cater to the ego's of the educators. The biggest factor in success or failure is the desire to achieve. That is determined by motivation and very few if any courses actually have teachers who can motivate a student to learn the subject. They fail to show relevancy for the subject.

    Educations should be about making sure all those who want to learn are taught- no matter how long it takes. It should not be run by the clock or the calendar. Some students can learn everything they need to know from school in four years and others might take twenty. Both deserve to be taught, if the material is truly relevant to life.

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  • 5 months ago

    the lowest of the low are going to fail anyways?

    that is a reason why your argument is flawed 

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  • 5 months ago

    Passing student that can't read/write above an 8th grade level is a travesty.

    Yet, Public Schools push them through with Union backing.

    Anybody EVER ask the student if they would like to attend Vo-Tech for a skill?

    These folks can get company paid training/schooling for maintaining a decent grade.

    Imagine, a high paying SKILL with ZERO student debt!!!!

    BTW, ALL children deserve a quality education.

    Would you vote for school vouchers to send these student to a private school?

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  • 5 months ago

    Because the high achievers are not fooled by the liberal BS that is being taught in public schools. 

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    I am between gearing classes toward slower students and harming the more able to learn - and the other way around.

    My daughter is in a grade which mixes learning disabled students and other students.  She is bored to death, the class repeats everything three times, and I am very unhappy with the standard of education.

    When I complained the district offered to let her skip a grade.

    I fail to see how this helps anyone.

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  • Anonymous
    5 months ago

    I've studied what's effective, and conservatives hate everything about it.  No evidence based cooperative education in groups.  No.  It's too effective and leads to education in the community.

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