Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Food & DrinkEthnic Cuisine · 1 month ago

Why is a certain British dessert called spotted dick?

And why are meatballs made from offal called *******?

Update:

I ask everything anonymously. 

7 Answers

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  • denise
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The 'spotted' bit is because of the dried fruit that's 'dotted' through the pudding [not sure  about dick though].

    The offal & pork meatballs are called '*******' because they were originally wrapped in lacy 'caul' fat, to keep moist whilst cooking.

    I think they got the name from bunches of twigs [kindling sticks] that were bound in thinner twigs and were called '*******'.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Janet has explained the use of the word “dick”, meaning pudding (it's also a shortened form of Richard).

    I assume that the other item is fag*ots?. I don't know about the history of the word but that's simply what they are called. The real question is, why did  the word come to be used in American English as an offensive term to describe a homosexual?

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  • 1 month ago

    Yah sounds gross

    • As an American you have no room to talk, your food is just a disgusting lump of chemical injected slop. No wonder the average American weighs 600 lbs +

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  • Janet
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    "While "spotted" is a clear reference to the dried fruit in the pudding (which resemble spots), "dick" and "dog" were dialectal terms widely used for pudding, from the same etymology as "dough" (i.e., the modern equivalent name would be "spotted pudding").[1] In late 19th century Huddersfield, for instance, a glossary of local terms described: "Dick, plain pudding. If with treacle sauce, treacle dick."[2] (from Wikipedia "spotted dick")

    This predates the current use of the word "dick" as an euphemism for the word "p*nis". The word dick meant pudding LONG before it means what you are interpreting it as.

    Cannot answer the second half of your question because the Y/A program has substituted ******* for whatever word you used.  

    Doesn't matter. Try looking things up online and learn to think for yourself.  

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  • C
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You ain't seen nuffink until you've had the Bedfordshire clanger, gotten your teeth stuck in Peggy's leg, demanded ruddy glue for afters and sighed with dismay when you got frog spawn instead!

    The f-word oft used in the UK for cigarettes literally means a "bundle," usually of sticks or straw.  It's also that thing the eagle on the US crest clutches in one claw except you dress it up in Latin. As a dish it's meaty bits "bundled" together inside a piece of caul fat.  The word never got overtaken from its primary meaning on this side of the pond.

    The spots in spotted dick are obviously the currants.  The best explanation for "dick" is that it's a play on an older alternative word for pudding - puddick, or maybe it was baby-talk for pudding.  It's a playful word.  Lots of old fashioned desserts have playful names, see above, also a great favourite of mine - whim wham or syllabub as a play on syllable.  Just because the "ye olden days" was a long time ago doesn't mean that people back then didn't take great delight in a childish sense of humour, except for the meatball thing.  That's just a description.  I've always wondered what kind of a person looked at a bundled of f-words stacked next to the fire as kindling and thought, "A-ha, just like homosexuals!"  Why not use "rolling pin" or "spindle" or something more manly like "piledriver" as slang?

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  • Lôn
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    The currants, sultanas and raisins in the light coloured pudding gives it a spotted appearance.

    'F a gg ots' are what they are...it's not our fault that Yanks call arsebandits by the same name.

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  • 1 month ago

    Convincingly explain why you're asking this question anonymously if you're not a troll and I'll answer you. If you don't explain, that confirms you're a troll. Sound fair?

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    • choko_canyon
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Fair? Inaccurate maybe, at least in 10% of the cases, but fair? There is no good reason to post anonymously. None. Unless of course, you're trolling and don't want to be discovered doing it or blocked because of it. 

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