Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsOutdoor RecreationHunting · 4 weeks ago

A 9MM FMJ vs a 45 ACP in Hollowpoint? 223 Remington in FMJ vs 308 Winchester in Hollowpoint?

So i know that a 45 ACP in FMJ would penetrate more than a 9MM in FMJ.

I also know that hollowpoint rounds penetrate less than FMJ rounds.

So what if you took a 45 ACP in HOLLOWPOINT and compared that to a 9MM in FMJ.  Which would penetrate more? one is a 45 ACP (more powerful) but the other is a FMJ (deeper penetration).  

Same with a 223 remington vs a 308 winchester.  The 308 is more powerful and would penetrate more than a 223 remington (if both were FMJ).  But what about a 223 remington in FMJ vs a 308 winchester in Hollowpoint (less penetration).  One is a 308 winchester (more powerful) but the other is FMJ (deeper penetration).

A 308 winchester in FMJ will penetrate more than a 223 remington in hollowpoint obviously, but that about what is in between (a 223 remington in FMJ or a 308 winchester in hollowpoint).

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  • Mr.357
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    First off, it would depend upon what you are trying to penetrate.  I have some 1/2" AR500 steel targets and ALL of those round penetrate well under 0.001"  If you are penetrating air, obviously the 9mm in either configuration will penetrate more than the 45 in either configuration.  Other materials would give different results.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    A hollow point in a defensive pistol cartridge is better than a FMJ, my personal preference is 9mm+P ballistic tips. As for the rifle, from a terminal ballistics stand point its negligible because it's a rifle. Technicalities with in parameters are different from over all practicality. 

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  • Rick
    Lv 6
    4 weeks ago

    I have a .308 and a .45 ACP, there's your answer ...............

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  • 4 weeks ago

    45 ACP wins. 308 Wins. It is not the speed of the bullet that matters but the over all force, which is the weight of the bullet combined with the speed. The .223 for example is little more massive than a bullet from a 22 long rifle.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Did you hear that from some guy at the range?  What you think you know is wrong.  You might want to do a little research before falling for such wildly false information.  Maybe go back to troll school and take a few more courses.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    Your entire premise is mostly incorrect, starting with the first thing that you "know".  Penetration depends a lot on WHAT it is being penetrated and the design of the cartridge/bullet.  For example, a hard barrier is more easily penetrated by 9mm FMJ than .45 ACP due to bullet's smaller diameter and higher velocity (the same reason that modern tanks use 3cm darts from sabot rounds out of their 10.5cm guns to pierce armor).  That is the reason that many state police don't use .45 ACP or .40 S&W.  They use .357 sig, which is .40 S&W necked down to a 9mm bullet.   BTW, .357 magnum is also a 9mm bullet and it penetrates pretty damn much.

    Your comparisons are too generalized. You should look to understand more about terminal ballistics and bullet design.  There are many different materials that a bullet can penetrate and many different "hollow point" designs.  I invite you to look tat Luck Gunner's real world tests of most of the major pistol cartridge products in ballistic gel with with clothing-like barrier:https://www.luckygunner.com/labs/self-defense-ammo... you can see the is a fairly wide range of penetration distances, but for self defense purposes most will do the job needed. For any given cartridge the more it expands, the less it penetrates.  You can presume that the .45 ACP tests that did not expand (had a final diameter of .45) behaved a lot like FMJ would have.

    The terminal ballistics of .223 FMJ behave differently depending on the velocity of the bullet and the material being penetrated.  At close ranges, the velocity of the .223 is such that it will lose stability when it hits a soft barrier, which often causes it to yaw and tumble and fragment, limiting penetration.  This is why test after test has shown that .223 FMJ will often penetrate interior walls LESS than pistol calibers.

    As for the .308 win, a lot depends on the design of the bullet.   Some bullets are designed for medium size dear and expand quickly, limiting penetration.  Others are designed for larger animals with tough hides that must be punched through and more meat to get to vital organs have a controlled expansion that increase penetration.Again, it is not clear what your goal is or what you are trying to learn, but terminal ballistics are more than simply penetration depth and generic calibers and bullet types.

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