Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Consumer ElectronicsCameras · 1 month ago

best camera for beginners suggestions? ?

Hi there, I’m taking a trip to Washington DC in May and want to take nice pictures. Many websites i have checked have suggested a cannon. I wouldn’t mind to get one with the different lenses to play around with. I believe i could learn fairly quickly. I think the cameras The websites recommend are the rebel model(?)perhaps I should buy a used one as they are not that expensive. If anyone has any suggestions please get back with me. I would like to take nice pictures of my beautiful girlfriend and scenery to document our first trip together. 

Update:

Don’t say smart phone. I have a cracked iPhone 7 camera.

16 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    I'm unsure that either is that the best camera for beginners. I'm an enormous believer in good lenses, and that I strongly discourage people from going out and buying any camera with a (mediocre) kit lens of say 18-55 and seeing this because of the end of the journey. It makes little sense.

    When you check out it like that, I'd much rather see on Quora, "Which is that the best lens for beginners" and that we could have some awesome discussions along the lines of "well what does one want to shoot?" which is usually where we accompany cameras, but with lenses, it might actually be more meaningful. The truth is it really doesn't matter what camera a beginner buys. If they're shopping entry-level the limitation goes to be the lens, not the camera. I personally recommend only 3 cameras for beginners counting on budget.

    Used D90, or D7100 or D700.Something these all have in common is that they need an inbuilt focus motor so someone can learn an excellent deal about photography for reasonable by buying older autofocus lenses that will not work on the D3xxx or D5xxx series. https://www.proaudiobrands.com/

    The D90 is that the entry-level decent camera. The D7100 may be a decent intensify, then on the brink of the D7000 in price when used that it makes more sense. The D700 is costlier but it is a full-frame camera that takes things to the subsequent level in terms of lens choice. Hope this helps

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  • 1 month ago

    I used this website and my new Nikon D3500 works perfectly.

    https://www.techradar.com/news/best-entry-level-ds...

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  • Sky
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    One of my cameras is the Canon Powershot S5IS and I love that thing.  It's quite an old camera now, but when I got it, it was miles beyond the point & shoot pocket camera I had.  That or its successor SX10IS would be great cameras for beginners because aside from the auto modes, they have all the manual modes that a DSLR would have so the beginning photographer can start taking more control of the camera as more photography skills are learned.  And regardless of the camera, it is important to learn about photography and the skills it takes to know how to compose and shoot a good photo.  There are many thousands of videos on youtube with tips and tutorials about photography, from the very basics of what the different settings are (aperture, shutter speed, ISO, etc.) up through pro level photo shoots for models or product photography.  It's the skills and knowledge that are important because a photographer who knows how to take a good picture will be able to take a good picture with a cheap camera, and a photographer who doesn't know the first thing about good pictures will take crap pictures with even pro level gear.

    So, I'd say get an older camera that has a lot of features like that (including a hot shoe for adding an external flash if you get one) so you can save money over getting something newer, learn its capabilities and limitations, and start watching videos on portrait and landscape photography as well as the fundamentals.  In time as your skills improve you can look into getting a DSLR or one of the mirrorless cameras that are gaining popularity, which will give you the ability to put different lenses on it.

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  • 1 month ago

    Getting an entry level Canon Rebel is a good idea. You will learn they have at least two levels, the Tn and Tni, where n designates the model and corresponds to the age. For instance the T3 and T3i are much older than the current T7 and T7i. I would get the higher level such as the T7i. Getting an older version (used) is a good idea. KEH.com, BHphotovideo.com, Amazon all sell used, and are good places to shop. Getting the kit lens, 18-50mm is a good place to start. Don't worry too much about learning everything about it, you can just put it in Auto mode and get great photos. But all the bells and whistles are there when you are ready for them. I do suggest you use it daily between now and when you go to DC.

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  • 1 month ago

    I use canon 70D with 18-135mm lense. It's good to start.

    If you think about image & video, then go with Action camera like GoPro

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Well i think the problem is my brothers mate richard his brother is a computer expert  down loaded off a  computer drug cook recipe off computer its off a ex american site.The site talked about soma and lsd and other even crack repice the australian army banned it as well

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  • 1 month ago

    You don't want more camera than you can handle ...And it takes years to master one .

      Doesn't matter if it's Canon , Nikon or Pentax ...All three make quality cameras .

    You don't say how much you want to spend .

    A place like Best Buy might be able to help you .Or try a web site like youtube . " Camera's for beginners " ...

  • keerok
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Screw those websites. They know nothing. No decent photo enthusiast would recommend a cannon for taking pictures!

    You seem to be interested with dSLRs. In that case it should be good to know that there are no dSLRs made for beginners. The term entry-level refers to budget. All dSLRs are basically the same and better yet, it is possible to get the same picture no matter what dSLR you use. It's all about you and your skill in photography.

    Knowing that, the cheapest ones are the worst. They are more difficult to use even when you know what you're doing. The best, budget-wise are the mid-level dSLR models. With Canon, those are the 2-digit models (and none of those Rebels and Xs). It's the same with other brands such as Nikon and Pentax. Learning is easier and more fun with a more capable camera. It is also cheaper in the long run since you won't be buying a second camera after you bought a cheap one for your first and decided later on you've outgrown it.

    The most popular camera brand is Canon (maybe that is why you get more suggestions for it) but that is where the difference ends. Nikon is also good especially if you love tinkering with settings fast. Pentax is great when specs don't matter and especially when you take it slow.

    Olympus and Panasonic both make them small, so much that they're no longer dSLRs. They call theirs mirrorless cameras, still with interchangeable lenses and are also good.

    I discourage you from buying used especially if you don't know what to look out for. When it comes t secondhand, it's not about the brand or model. It's all about camera condition. You must be able to test it thoroughly first. Too many duds out there. Even I have my own share of experience from them (considering I've bought more than 20 of these used dSLRs already).

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  • Frank
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Anything with an interchangeable lens will be good enough for your stated needs.  Any DSLR such as the Canon T series (a.k.a. Rebel) will provide any beginner with all of the features and performance that they'd need.  The same could said about any DSLR or even any of the mirrorless cameras from Fujifilm, Sony, Canon, or Nikon.

    Put some of these cameras in your hand and decide which one fits your hand the best.  Unfortunately, this is getting harder and harder to do as camera shops go the way of the Dodo bird.

    What would make one camera better for landscapes and portraits would be one with more pixels and a larger sensor.  For this reason full-frame cameras are better than APS-C cameras for landscapes and portraiture.  However, this is definitely not to say that one needs to go with a full-frame camera if they want excellent results when shooting landscapes and/or portraiture.

    Another thing about landscapes is that you really do need a wide lens.  The T series from Canon only comes with an 18-55mm lens.  The 18mm on an APS-C is equivalent to a 28mm lens on a full-frame camera.  This is 'okay' for landscapes, but you'd be better off with a wider lens like a 10-22mm.  The 55mm position is okay for portraiture, but you'd do better with a longer lens like a 55-250 or a prime lens like an 85mm.   But a beginner really won't have the experience to benefit from a prime, so go with a T series from Canon, a D3xxx from Nikon, a Pentax K-70, or a mirrorless from Sony or Fujifilm.  Then make sure to get the lens that you need for landscapes and portraiture because the kit lens will be just okay.

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  • Andrew
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    You need a camera, not a piece of field artillery - the camera manufacturer is CANON.

    The Rebel series are basic DSLRs, equivalent to Nikon's D3xxx (fixed screens) and D5xxx (swivel screens), as well as Pentax' K-70.  All come with an 18-55mm lens which gives a moderate wideangle to a short telephoto - if you want anything longer, you'll have to buy another lens.  They are excellent learning tools if you want to study serious photography.

    EVIL/Mirrorless/CSC (different names for the same thing) are smaller and lighter than DSLRs due to their lack of the mirror box and prism that serves the DSLR as an optical viewfinder - they use electronic viewfinders (miniature TV screens) instead.

    Bridge cameras use a VERY small sensor, coupled to a long zoom lens as an attempt to provide an all-in-one solution.  Most have basic manual controls, if you aren't too worried about learning the art of photography.

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