Do any moons have moons?

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  • Speed
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    So far, none has been discovered. See https://earthsky.org/space/can-moons-have-their-ow... for details.

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  • 4 weeks ago

    None that we have Noticed

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Not that anyone knows of.  Certainly there are none in our solar system.  But it's entirely possible they could exist around other stars.

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  • Lôn
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    No, they don't.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Pluto is a dwarf planet smaller than our moon. It has a moon called charon, of nearly equal size.

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    • CarolOklaNola
      Lv 7
      4 weeks agoReport

      Pluto is not a Moon. Pluto and Charon are dwarf planets. Ceres was promoted from minor planet to dwarf planer. Minor B planets, asteroids, definitely DO have other asteroids as Moons in the Solar System. 

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  • 4 weeks ago

    In the modern sense of a moon (small m) being a natural satellite, there are no signs of this within our Solar system.

    Back in the 1960s and 1970s, people used the word "moon" for any object - natural or artificial - in orbit around a planet.

    Sputnik, Echo, the Mercury capsules, etc. were popularly called "moons" even though they were not natural objects. If you accept this definition, then humans have placed "moons" around our Moon (Earth's natural satellite) and around Titan (a satellite of Saturn).

    Orbits around a satellite are unstable over long periods. This is why any probe placed in orbit around our Moon must also come with a plan to get rid of it once its job is done (usually by crashing it onto the Moon), to make sure it will not go into an unstable orbit and become a danger to future missions.

    So, it does not look promising. A natural object having a stable orbit (over millions of years) around a planet's satellite would be very improbable.

    But not impossible.

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