Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentElections · 4 weeks ago

How exactly does the Electoral college work? Does it always supersede the popular vote?

Is it systemically possible for the popular vote to override the Electoral college if the popular vote is high enough? Or does the electoral college always matter more than the popular vote?

4 Answers

Relevance
  • KaleyK
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago
    Favorite Answer

    In general, the popular vote within each state determines the electoral vote for that state.  Because the states have different populations, it is entirely possible for a candidate to win the electoral vote and not the popular vote.

    Consider this:  There are about 40 million people in California.  Let's assume all of them vote.  If the candidate gets 20,000,001 votes, they will win 53 electoral votes.  If the candidate gets all 40,000,000 votes, the candidate still only gets 53 electoral votes.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 4 weeks ago

    Each state has "electors".  The number of electors equals the number of representatives in Congress.  The popular vote within a state determines which candidate gets the electoral votes for that state.  According to the Constitution, the Electoral College is the deciding body for electing the President, and ONLY the President.  Some states are talking about adopting this method for electing governors since, in most states, a few well populated counties determine the election.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    Technically someone can win with less than 25% of the vote.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • David
    Lv 7
    4 weeks ago

    Ever since the first day when the Constitution was ratified, the Electoral College is the authority.  But the popular vote DOES matter, in each of the 51 individual states and the District of Columbia, because that's how the electoral delegates are selected.

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.