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Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 3 months ago

Does anyone have any info on the murder of Anna Gassie of New Orleans in 1966?

I recently learned that my maternal grandfather's second wife, Anna Gassie, was murdered on August 21, 1966, by her own son-in-law.  Her maiden name was Anna O Matvejeff (1902–1966).  She was a "White Russian" whose family  fled to  China to escape the Communist Revolution.  Then she married my grandfather, a US Marine stationed in Peking, circa 1927, and lived in New Orleans, Louisiana, during WWII until her death.  I was told that there is an article about her murder in the  New Orleans Times-Picayune in 1966.  If someone would tell me the name of the killer, then I should be able to verify if this is the same Anna who was part of my family tree by marriage.  I couldn't find anything on Newspapers.com and I can't afford an annual membership at My Heritage at the moment.  Anna had a lovely daughter named Helen Lucia Gassie who died on May 17, 1951 at the age of 24.  I don't know the circumstances of Helen's death, but it's very sad that tragedy struck my grandfather's second family twice.  I am trying to complete my family tree, but I know that genealogical sites have lots of errors, so it is important to verify information. Thank you in advance for any help.  

Update:

I also couldn't find anything about this terrible incident on Ancestry.com and I have full access to the site. 

Update 2:

I have been informed that the killer wasn't Anna's daughter's husband but her granddaughter's husband.  Still need the name of the killer.  

Update 3:

I found the info I was seeking on GenealogyBank -- everything except the motive for the brutal crime.  I had not realized that Anna Gassie divorced my grandfather in 1946 and remarried a Norwegian seaman.  She was known as Mrs. Anna Anderson at the time of her death.  The killer's name was Matthew Robert Solbach.  He confessed to the murder and was sentenced to life in prison.  

1 Answer

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    3 months ago
    Favorite Answer

    So go to the library and search the newspapers, it is free to do and you will find stories of the event.

    Yyou can also see where the court records are held and if you can get access to the trail papers like https://www.archives.gov/fort-worth/finding-aids/r...

    • MissionBlue3 months agoReport

      That would be the sensible thing to do but I don't have a lot of free time during business hours.  I'd hate to go on a wild goose chase if the story is inaccurate.  The person who told me about it was very young at the time.  Still, she remembered about it so maybe somebody else does too.  .

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