Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsAstronomy & Space · 1 month ago

Does the boiling of water happen when water is 212 degrees F or the air?

Let’s say the Earths oceans averaged at 120 degrees F. Then the air temperature was 250 degrees F for 6 hours and then went to 30 degrees F for the remaining 18 hours. Would the oceans boil at those 6 hours? 

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  • Bill-M
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    When the Water Temperature reaches 212F or 100C  (AT sea level) it will Boil.

    The higher altitude you go, the lower the Temperature water will boil.

    The answer to your question is the water not the air.

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  • Retief
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Water boils when it reaches 212 degrees F.

    If the air is that temperature, the water may still be less and won't boil.

    If the air temperature was 250 F for 6 hours the oceans still wouldn't boil because the deep ocean is very cold and the ocean doesn't circulate the varying temperatures well.

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  • 1 month ago

    It depends really on the Altitude

     The higher up the thinner the Air is and lesser the heat capacity is

     And the more likely water vapour is to boil

    The same goes for the Gas Giants in our Solar System

     Like Jupiter, beneath all that Gas, the pressure is so high there is thought to be liquid metallic Hydrogen

    You just cant reproduce that in the kitchen Bro

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  • 1 month ago

    When water is 212° F AT SEA LEVEL and 1 atmosphere pressure

    At higher elevations where the air pressure is LESS than 1 atmosphere, water boils at LOWER temperatures. This is SHY you need to use high elevation baking times and directions at elevations higher than 3500 feet

    I have personal life experience baking at sea level in New Orleans AND the Oklahoma panhandle at more than 3500 feet elevation.

    No, the seas and oceans would NOT boil. They ate NOG pure water. What is IN the water AND the AIR PRESSURE ON the water CHANGES the temperature at which water boils. Water has a high heat capacity. That means it takes a long time to heat up AND cool down no matter what the AIR temperature and pressure may be.  This is why you can go wading in the Gulf of Mexico in October and the water temperature is in the 80s°F range, like 86°F in October 1979. 

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  • Clive
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It's nothing to do with the temperature of the air.  The only question is is this enough to make all the WATER heat up to 212F.  Probably not, though the surface might start to steam.

    Water has a very high specific heat capacity - the amount of heat you need to put into a specific quantity of water to raise the temperature by one degree.  It's one of the unusual things about it.  So most likely, having hot air is nowhere near enough heat to boil the oceans.

    Working the opposite way, though, bear in mind that the air pressure matters too.  And the air being hotter will reduce the atmospheric pressure, which will make the boiling point of water come down.  Try to make tea or coffee on the top of Mount Everest - you won't get a decent cup, as the water boils much lower than 212F because the air pressure is much lower there.  But probably this has less effect than the specific heat capacity.

    Now what does this have to do with astronomy and space?

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  • 1 month ago

    Air temperature doesn't have anything directly to do with the boiling point of water.  Only the air's PRESSURE does.

    More specifically, the "vapor pressure" of the air does.

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  • 1 month ago

    Boiling occurs when the internal temp of the water reaches 212 degF. Water has a very high specific heat meaning its difficult to heat up or cool down. The oceans wouldn't come anywhere near boiling.

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