Income tax and teenager getting a job?

Please bear with me on this. I just repatriated. I have not lived here in the USA in a very long time. I filed a tax return every year from abroad, but it was more of a formality because my income was 105K a year and the IRS allowed me to exempt up to 120K as forgien earned income.

I am a software developer and I historically am not very good with filling out forms. I just followed the instructions from the IRS. I called them once with questions, and the person on the phone was amazing. She helped me though it the first time, then after that it was cake. 

I also completed all the immigration forms for my wife and son myself.  Now I am pretty good at filling out forms.I brought my wife and my "son" whom I am adopting. He is 15, and wants to get a job at Von’s where he can bag groceries. How will the income tax work? I will be claiming him on my taxes because when I go back to work, I will be making a middle-class income. According to the IRS the minimum income to pay taxes is 12,000. He will not make anything close to that working part time in the summer for petty pocket money and social interaction. Really, he is getting a job for something to do. He will spend it all socializing with his mates and playing games on steam.If you have a child who works part time, how did you file your taxes?

Update:

Yes, I am a US Citizen, and a Veteran, just in case you wanted to know.

Update 2:

He has a green card. His current status immigration status is IR2 :"son or daughter of a US citizen"..Yes, I know it seems strange that he was allowed to immigrate pending the adoption.  The story is too long to get into.

Update 3:

He has a green card and an SSN.

6 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    He files his own return and likely gets all withheld income taxes back because he won't make enough to owe. You can still claim him, his income in no way affects your taxes.

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  • 1 month ago

    The $12,000 was the minimum for a person who can't be claimed by anyone else. Because you can claim him, the minimum may be lower for him.

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  • NA
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    1.  No job until you get him an SSN.

    2.  Then he applies.  If this is his ONLY income (no investments in his name, no self employment), he can probably put exempt on the W-4 as you said he is unlikely to go over $12,400 for 2020.

    3.  The trip up for him is if he reports tips to his employer like he is supposed to and someone gives him a $100 tip.  The tips are subject to FICA/MC from his wages.  Adults who are waiters often owe at the end of the year.  A bagging job is unlikely to be a problem.

    • Marvin
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      May I ask who said he did not have an SSN?

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  • 1 month ago

    You file your taxes just as you would if he didn't have a job. Claim your son by listing his name and tax ID number (either Social Security number or ITIN number) in the dependents section of  your return. You will get a $2000 child tax credit for him as long as he is under 17 at the end of the tax year. When he turns 17 you'll get a $500 credit for that year and every year thereafter for as long as he continues to qualify as your dependent (or until the tax laws change again).

    Your son files his own return. You do NOT report his income on your return.

    If your son earns more than $12,200 (for 2019, amount will change slightly in the future) he is legally required to file a return. But even if he earns less than the limit he will want to file if his employer withholds taxes, because filing would get him a refund of those taxes. All he needs to do is check the box indicating that someone else can claim him as a dependent.

    this is normal, every year millions of people claim teenage or young adult children as dependents while those children or young adults file their own returns to report their own part-time income.

    If your son files and forgets to mark the box indicating that he's a dependent under another taxpayer then you'll be rejected if you try to file electronically. It can be fixed but requires him filing an amended return and you mailing a return. For this reason, I recommend that you file your return first. After your return is sent and accepted by the IRS, he can file his. If he forgot to check the box as a dependent then the IRS computers would reject his return, which he could fix by simply checking that box and resubmitting it.

    As long as your son meets the age requirements, lives in your home, and does not provide more than 50% of his own financial support you can legally claim him as a dependent. There is no firm income limit on his income. Even if he earns a significant amount of money he could still be your dependent if he's saving that money and you're providing housing, food, etc.

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  • 1 month ago

    His "earned income" (income from working) will have no effect on your return.

    He can make up to $12,200 per year without paying taxes.  If you are sure that he won't make that much, he can claim "Exempt" on his W4.  However, he will still have to pay Social Security and Medicare.  There is no escaping those.

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  • 1 month ago

    1. Until your paperwork clears...can he actually work?  I mean, it sounds like everything here is legit, just wondering. 

    2. Are you sure they'll hire him at 15...most wait until 16. 

    You make over $100k a year, go and hire an accountant to assist you and then copy their work going forward.  

    Per your update, honestly, thats irrelevant here.  Veterans do bad things too, but I'm assuming everything here is above board.  

    • Marvin
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      He has a green card.

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