Connor asked in PetsDogs · 1 month ago

Dog question and moving out. ?

I’m 19 years old turning 20 this year, and I still live with my parents. I am planning on moving out this year, I graduated high school in 2019, and I took a gap year and now I’m starting college in the fall. NOW here comes my biggest question, I have a dog, I bought this dog when I was 14, I trained her, and she has been with me since. 

We have 3 other dogs and we are a family of 6, she gets along with everyone, my question is when I move out, would it be bad to take her with me? Or would it be better for her to stay with my family and I come visit? 

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  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    In my honest opinion, what's best overall for the dog is to stay where she is. Dogs LOVE and thrive on routine. You are young and experiencing college life for the first time in your life. You will have to study, A LOT. You will want to take breaks, maybe party with some friends, have people over, go out, have a life, and you can't do this with an older dog locked into a routine. For example, she's used to being fed at 7am on the dot. You have a 7:20am class clear across campus. Then she gets play time right after. You will not be there. Dinner is promptly at 6pm. for her, always has been. You have a HUGE test to study for and are stuck in the library because the next bus doesn't come until 7pm. I'm just giving you examples of what you will face with college life and a dog at the same time, and college changes every year; you won't have the same time table for classes.

    However, if you believe it's worth a shot, try it and see if you can't work out something, but if she's showing signs of depression and it's simply too much for YOU to do as a new college student, take her back to your family, if you can. If you are moving 1000 miles away, you have to decide now or never. I would love nothing more to say, yes, take her, but you have to do what's right for her.

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  • 1 month ago

    Leave her with your parents and the rest of your dog's 'pack'. She'll be fine and ctually doesn't really KNOW she's your dog. Like the others, she's family dog. If you leave her back home, that will give you far more freedom to concentrate on your further education and social life. Having her with you could make accommodation difficult too.

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  • Trisha
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    You should let her have a family of her own.

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  • PR
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    I agree mainly with what "Mrs. Frankenstein" has said, but you will need to consider how bonded the dog is, with you. Are there other family members the dog is also friendly with, and will play with, etc?

    If your dog is a "family dog", then she ought to be O.K. with staying with your family. 

    Ask your parents to watch the dog and let you know how she is doing. Get updates on her. Be sure you have an agreement with your family, what will/should happen if she gets sick. Do you want to be notified? Do you want to have a say in what to do, if she gets an illness the vet suggests is serious? (in other words would you want her euthanized without your having any input?).

    Have a very clear understanding what you expect in these circumstances, with a dog who is not with you, but you care about.

    If you find the dog is not happy with you away, see if you can then have her brought to you so you can try it out with her in your facilities. Of course, then you would need to be somewhere that allows dogs, and not all rooms, apartments, etc. will.

    If your dog "gets along with everyone" and there are also 3 other dogs there, she ought to be O.K. with being at her home she is used to. Check to see how she is doing, and be sure your family will be honest with you.

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  • 1 month ago

    Don't you have to live in the Dorms your first yr? Don't think dogs would go over very well there. Are you going to try to live off campus? How many yrs will this go on? Did you think about this when you got the dog yrs ago?

    It would be hard on the dog if you took it with you. It would be all by itself most all the time. Not fair to the dog. It should stay at your moms where it has been for 5 yrs. It has people & other dogs & is not lonely. You can give your mom some money for feeding & caring for your dog. With a dog you couldn't get a part time job for spending money. The dog needs you home as much as you can possibly can be. A job would take you away.

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  • 1 month ago

    Youre going to have a hard time finding an affordable place that allows a dog... And then when you are juggling work AND college.. You wont have time for a dog.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I think this is up to you. When my daughter moved out she had a similar issue with her cat. We were worried her cat would be lonely while my daughter went to classes and work but her cat actually did a lot better and seems happier. So I'd suggest just give it try and see how it works out.

    Those saying college & apartments may not allow pets - It really depends on the area. My daughter lived in an on campus apartment that allowed pets. She later moved off campus to an apartment that allows pets. She currently has 2 cats, 2 rats, a snake and fish in her apartment.

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  • 1 month ago

    You'll have trouble finding an apartment that will accept pets.

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  • 1 month ago

    I think you should leave her where she is.   Think of the hours she's going to be on her own in a strange place. 

    College is no place for a dog IMO

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  • 1 month ago

    I'd talk to your family about it and see what they say, as they may not want you to take the dog. The dog would adjust eventually if you did take the dog with you but may end up with separation anxiety when left by itself as it would be used to having the other dogs around. 

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