Dose film expire can you get old throw away  Cameras developed? ?

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  • Speed
    Lv 7
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    When my mom died, I was in charge of clearing her home and dealing with her things. Among the possessions was a camera with a partially used roll of film. Maybe a year later I got it developed, and it was of an event that happened twenty years earlier, the college graduation of one of her grandchildren. The film didn't seem to have degraded at all, to my surprise. (It was Kodak film, if that matters.)

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  • Alan
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    Film is constructed by suspending super tiny light sensitive chemical crystals of silver bromine or silver chlorine or silver iodine in binder (glue) made of unflavored gelatin. This light sensitive mixture, called an emulsion is then coated on a clear plastic film base.

      

    Now photographic film has an indefinite shelf life. This time period is normally about 2 years if the user desires optimum quality. However, long after the labeled expiration date, it is likely that discernible images will result should the film be developed and printed.  

    Shelf life of photo film is indefinite because some environmental factors can retard or accelerate. If the film has been stored in a cool dry place, likely the resulting images will be satisfactory. On the other hand, if the storage place is subject to above comfortable room temperature and perhaps wet conditions,  the resulting images will be substandard or worst.

      

    Some films taken by artic explorers we lost for nearly a 100 years and they developed up nicely. On the other hand, film found in the glove compartment of a car, were so comprised, nothing recognizable resulted.  

    It will be the luck of the draw. Send this film out for developing and take what comes. You might experience the thrill of lost treasure or defeat.    

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  • Frank
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Yes, film does expire but only when not stored in a freezer.  Film, like fruit, will expire and just like fruit, the expiration date can be extended (beyond the use-by date) simply by storing the film in a refrigerator.  Placing film in freezer will extend the life of the film indefinitely.  However, this DOES NOT apply to instant film like those from Polaroid.  Placing instant film in the freezer will damage the film, but a refrigerator is a perfectly acceptable way of lengthening the life of all film including instant film.

    When film gets old a few things happen.  For color print and slide film, one should expect a color shift often towards magenta or cyan.  The ISO of the film (i.e. its sensitivity to light) will decrease as well.  B&W film doesn't have color so no color shift, but it will loose some of its sensitivity.  How much depends upon the film, how it was stored and just how out of date it is.  I once had some Polaroid film that was out of date by several years that had been stored in a closet.  The film produced images that had a heavy cyan color cast to it.

    Because of the color shift, artists often intentionally use expired film for the specific look that it creates.

    All of this applies to film as well as for disposable cameras, too.

    Also consider that Kodak and Fujifilm both make amateur and professional film.  The differences are that the pro films have a broader contrast range and their color is less saturated with excellent skin tones for both Caucasian and dark-skinned people.  Amateur film is like buying a slightly unripened fruit like a banana.  As it ages (or "ripens") the film actually gets a little better.  But pro film is like buying the same piece of fruit at its peak of ripeness which means you better use it soon or else.  For this reason, pros will always store their pro films in either a refrigerator or a freezer for long-term storage.

    Just like how a carton of milk will be perfectly fine a for a few days after the printed expiration date, so will film.  So a roll of 35mm film that expired 6 months ago should be perfectly fine unless it was stored in a really bad place like the trunk of a car.  This is why you want to store your film in a cool dry place if not in a fridge or freezer.  If you do store film in a fridge or freezer, take the plastic canister out and let it warm up for at least 30 mins to an hour before using it to prevent condensation forming on the film which can cause water marks on the film.

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  • 1 month ago

    Old film can certainly be processed although the quality may be diminished.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Does, not dose.  Stay in school, kid.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    It can still be developed even if the film is expired.

    I called and actually talked to a film developing place about the same thing. I have disposable cameras that around 12 years old. I called and inquired because I had found them cleaning out the shed and they were my grade school camping trip. I would LOVE to see what's on them. They confirmed that the film can be developed, but it's more likely than not expired. This simply means that there's a decent chance I'll pay to have unviewable pictures developed. They still can be, but the quality might be shoddy because of their age.

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  • Mark
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    Yes, film, expires, but not for a very long time (like 5 years).

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