Matt
Lv 6
Matt asked in Business & FinanceInvesting · 1 month ago

Why has the value of old coins gone down in the last 15 years?  ?

4 Answers

Relevance
  • 1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    I suspect old coins have gone down in value in the same way that collectibles in general have gone down in value.  Because of the internet, nothing is hard to find anymore.  Anything you want, you can look up and likely find a seller for.  It wasn't like that in the 90s, when you had to go to flea markets and garage sales searching for stuff.  Collectibles just aren't that hard to come by anymore.

  • 1 month ago

    The price of many old coins is controlled soley by the price of gold and silver. They move little on their numismatic value.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 month ago

    Markets for practically anything do not go up in a straight line. Values fluctuate. This is especially the case with anything that's collected. Some coin values have fallen from higher levels and some have gained in value. A good number of older US coins have silver content, and a major reason for the increase in value during your 15 year period was the dramatic rise in the price of silver.  Common Morgan and Peace silver dollars went from having about $6 worth of silver in 2004 to having about $27 in 2011-2013, when silver prices peaked. Today, one has about $14 in silver.  Those commons still sell for more than their melt value, but values have fallen.

    This had a corresponding effect on numismatic (collector) coins. In both directions, up and down. The truly, truly rare coins, the ones that sell in the prestigious auctions, are not totally immune to this, though on most, values have continued to rise or at least held their value.

    Another factor is changing demographics. The primary audience for this market is aging. Millennials are beginning to gain a reputation for not collecting things. Its effecting many markets, particularly antiques and general household items that are handed down in families. Millennials as a group (there are always exceptions to any trend) do not want their parents or grandparents 'stuff' - they have no interest in it, or, because they change jobs and move more frequently than earlier generations, they don't want the burdens of storing it and moving it. Stamp collecting has been on the decline since some time in the 1970s. Coin collecting comes and goes in cycles. The State Quarters program started in 1999 brought in many new collectors and a lot of young people, but was not able to hold most of them long enough to become serious collectors that would support the older coin market.

    That can change, though. If the US Congress ever votes to stop producing one cent coins and they start to dry up in circulation, more people might think about collecting them and some of that would move to other coins.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 1 month ago

    What old coins??  Collecting coins is a hobby.  Coins popular 15 years ago are possibly not so desirable today.  

    I have a few dozen Morgan silver dollars from the 1800's & early 1900's.  Some of mine are worth more than I paid for them.  And some are worth less.  

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.