Can a business deny service because of their assumptions about your character and based on what others said about you?

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  • larry1
    Lv 6
    1 month ago
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    Possibly.....

    No, by the Civil Rights Act (1964) no business vending to the public in the USA can deny service, to any member of the public on account of race, gender, point of origin, ethnic group, etc.

    But, for other reasons not related...yes....A seller/ business can deny service to whom they want due to the persons misbehavior/ known convictions and prior wrong deeds.

    The person so excluded by 1 private businessman, must the sue in small claims to get/ regain access.

    • Lara1 month agoReport

      Thank you.This is based on the owners' personal whim/mere assumption. It was also based on the personal relations of one person in this establishment with the person who was denied entry (outside of the establishment: ex husband). The person did not exhibit any aggressive or rude behavior(female).

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  • 4 weeks ago

     discrimination in the workplace includes when an employer, supervisor, or co-worker treats another employee unfairly based on religion, age, ethnicity, gender, disability, skin color, or race. This enables employees to know their rights and employers to avoid any situations involving discrimination.

    http://www.rtssol.com/

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  • 1 month ago

    A private business can deny service for any reason other than you being part of a protected class.

    • Lara1 month agoReport

      Um my mom was denied service at an eye care center for no reason, They did not tell her a reason. Discrimination is subtle sometimes. And she has an accent. We complained to them and they apologized and accepted her next time because we told them we will sue.

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  • 1 month ago

    Yes, they can, they can deny service to whoever they please for any reason, including just on a whim, EXCEPT they cannot deny you based on any of the discriminatory reasons, such as race, color, religion, gender and so on.  If they just don't like you they can decline to serve you.

    • Lara1 month agoReport

      Julia Roberts’ character was refused service at an upscale Beverly Hills boutique in the movie Pretty Woman. This is an example of an arbitrary decision and if it had happened in real life could have resulted in a lawsuit. Maybe arbitrary reasons outside the protected classes..?

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  • 1 month ago

    Not if it's open to the public, no.

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