What's appropriate way to fix concrete floor in any of homes?

My house has 3 car garage and they are attached to my house. It has about 700 square feet of concrete floor. One side floor got badly cracked and stinking into ground. I calculated just the bad parts of concrete. It's only 110 square feet that got damaged and uneven to garage floor.

I bring in couple of estimators, none of them willing tear out just 110 square feet only. They told me they doesn't do small area, they will tear the whole 700 square feet to put all new flooring.

So what's your thought? It cost 6 grand to tear out old concrete then even the floor out with new concrete.

I thought not neccessary tear awhole floor if 600 square feet concrete still good and flat. Just only need 100 square feet of new concrete.

So what's your suggestion?

9 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    2 days ago

    It is a garage.  The cars won't care.  I personally would just mix up topping cement and make the sunken section higher.  It may sink some more or it may not.  Not like you are playing billiards on it.

    . close enough for the girls I go out with.

    After all, China is at the bottom so it is going to stop eventually

    Am thinking they did not pack that area as well as the rest...so now it has settled more.  Probably was a thin slab anyways.(which is more prone to not being able to support itself when left hanging.

    - You also COULD JUST BREAK OUT THE BROKEN LOWER SECTION & SPREAD GRAVEL INSTEAD.SEEN THAT DONE AS WELL. Really it is your choice

    Just talk to the guys at the HOME DEPOT in the cement area and explain your situation and age of structure and they will probably suggest what I did but they may have pictures or be more exacting as to the exact procedure...leaving the sunken slab in the floor.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 4 days ago

    There is a process where they pump loose concrete into the gap under the slab to raise and even out the sunken part.  The gap could be caused by just about anything from nearby tree roots, animals digging out underneath it or shifting landscaping.  It's not going to be perfect when they finish.  You may want to consider digging down further and installing a grease pit in that part of the garage, so you can work underneath the car more easily.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 4 days ago

    you need to solve the earth subsiding under the floor problem before you do anything else at all. after that, look for local handyman who has concrete experience ... he'll be far cheaper

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 5 days ago

    Do you even know what kind of reinforcing steel is in the concrete? That is the important thing, not the area of the concrete patch. The most important thing is to have a foundation that is not cracked and well supported on the ground. Do you have that? The new floor will crack again if the foundation is cracked and continues to fail. How will the new floor be tied to the foundation and remaining concrete? You have to tie to existing rebar in the foundation. So, you are looking at the problem wrong. It is not the size of the area, it is how the new area reinforcing steel ties into existing work. You may have to tear out old work to get to a place where you can tie-in. For example, if you have rebar, a guy with a jack hammer can knock the concrete off of the rebar and salvage enough to do the small area. So, you need to call the guy back and talk about this some more. You might look up some concrete slab design and see how a slab of concrete is made. You probably have a bad foundation which will need to be repaired first before the slab. You know that you will spend 6 grand, you need to determine what needs to be done for the 6 grand.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 5 days ago

    I understand you thought of trying to patch a damaged area and trying to be frugal but friend unless you intend to tear up the bad area and drill into the good concrete about two feet where each rebar is and then use fiberglass reinforced concrete you're just not going to get a real repair. And that's a lot of work It will look good for a little while. But eventually the area that you repaired is going to go to sinking again it needs to come up all the way the ground needs to be compacted rebar lay down and wire and then repored otherwise you're just going to have the same situation

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Eva
    Lv 7
    5 days ago

    If it's sinking it means the base wasn't properly prepared or that there's ground water running underneath it and eroding it. Just because the rest of looks ok now, doesn't mean it is. Keep looking for another contractor.

    • Greedy5 days agoReport

      Ok, so yeah go ahead spent 6 grands to get all new concrete just to be sure there is nothing bad underneath the concrete floor then. Won't know until old concrete get removed first

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 5 days ago

    It is not that big of a deal. Why not tear out the old floor yourself and then pour the new concrete yourself. 

    Before you do that you need to figure out why the floor is cracking and sinking. There is clearly something wrong with the soil under the slab.

    • Greedy5 days agoReport

      Yeah can, well it go very slowly, home is 45 years old, cracking doesn't start till 25 years ago, it become noticeable just 10 years ago, last 3 years crack get big that anybody can fall down if not look when walking pass the crack

    • Login to reply the answers
  • P
    Lv 7
    5 days ago

    The problem with concrete is most companies will want to bring it in by the concrete truck load.  Small loads would be manually mixed onsite which most places won't want to deal with the extra labor.  They pay for the full truck load weather you use it or not.  They also want to make sure it doesn't crack again and to do that they need to take out the whole floor to address anything that could be causing it.  

    If you ask around enough for referrals you may be able to find a concrete crew that would work for cash and offer no real guarantees and probably not speak much english, but would do the 100sf for much less.  I suppose you could take a look at it after they jack out the bad section before they pour, but you really have to know the right way to get it done to supervise the project otherwise guys like that will cut corners.

    • ...Show all comments
    • P
      Lv 7
      5 days agoReport

      Sure, that's one way to do it.  As long as you don't have a foundation issue with your footings it shouldn't be that big of a deal.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    5 days ago

    If the concrete is sinking into the ground, THAT is likely why it cracked.  You may have a water problem or some other type of problem under the garage.   If I'm right, re-pouring 110 sq feet of the cracked concrete will do nothing to fix the underlying problem.

    Pouring concrete requires heavy equipment whether it's 110 sq feet or 700 sq feet.   Contractors have the right to decline small jobs.

    If the concrete was just cracked and not sinking, I'd do nothing.  It's just a garage.   But the sinking...I'd want to figure out why that was happening. 

    • Greedy5 days agoReport

      Ok well home is 45 years old. Been living in house for years, the crack and sinking doesn't start until 25 years ago, it was very tiny crack then get worse as years go by, it wasn't noticeable until 10 years ago. In last 3 years, the cracked get high which get tip over and fall if not pay attention 

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.