How does one weigh a ghost?

I am trying to ship a ghost to China. As I understand they have no ghosts in China and I would like to share my bounty of ghosts. How do I weigh one of my ghosts to calculate shipping costs?

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  • 1 month ago

    Ghosts have negative mass and negative weight. They fall up. So put it in a ghost box and post office will owe you money. The postage cost is negative.

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  • 1 month ago

    Ghosts have no rest mass because they never rest. This means that they have no weight in the normal sense and cannot be weighed except by using a Centrifugal Keeywaddle.

    I have never seen  a Keeywaddle of either the paraputic nor the centrifugal type. I have only heard of one being used by my Grandfather.  Alas he is now dead and I don't know where he put his. You may find one online. Google it, good luck.

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  • 1 month ago

    Do you realize that there is a boycott on the sending of ghosts to China?  It is part of Trumps trade war. So if you get caught expect to spend a LONG time in a federal prison for espionage/threatening national security/ just not being very nice.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    There is a special rate add box for paranormal material it isn't based on weight. It's a flat rate box

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    A ghost has a negative weight.  The overall effect is to reduce the weight and hence reduce the transport-cost of the shipment containing the ghost.

    This means *you* can charge the shipping company a fee for reducing their transport costs.  I suggest you charge $50 per ghost.

    • Andrew S1 month agoReport

      I doubt they will go for that but Free shipping would be good.

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  • 1 month ago

    That is far from the truth. Your assertions about accuracy and ghosts in general call to mind two literary antecedents. First, Tim O’Connoley’s Ghost Hunting book (novel? memoir? short story collection?), “The Things They Whispered,” in which the author and/or the narrator distinguishes between “happening-truth” and “story-truth.” Happening-truth is what “really” occurred, whereas story-truth is more of the resonance, the implication of the factual. In other words, story-truth is fictional, kind of.

    • Andrew S1 month agoReport

      Is story truth anything like a scale?

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