Find spray paint that matches my car?

I ran off the road and tore up my bumper, then decided to fix it myself. I’m all set to fix the crack but I’m nervous to match the paint my self, especially since I’m planning on just using spray paint. If I were to bring in a chunk of my bumper that broke off would an employee be able to help me get the color right. It’s an imperial blue 2008 Chevy impala if anyone has a paint recommendation also. 

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7 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    yeah, employee can help.  It is a bumper and bumpers get bumped  I barely noticed it right now., sooo, for the girls you go out with, it will be close enough.  Maybe some day, you will paint the bumper flat black...for that 2 tone look.

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  • Bort
    Lv 6
    1 month ago

    The best place to get the exact color if you really want it to be as close as it's possible to get it to be to the rest of the car is at a dealer or body shop. There is a VIN / Manufacturers sticker on the rocker panel or door frame or on the back of the drivers side door when it's opened. That sticker has a lot of information on it. One of the things that will be on that sticker is the exact paint color code. A body shop or dealer can get that exact color for you in a "touch up" can or bottle. 

    Matching the paint exactly on an older vehicle that hasn't been garage kept (out of the elements / weather) is difficult to do because weather and the sun causes the paint to change and fade. That's why it's really best to paint the entire body part so there isn't a spot on that part that's darker or looks blemished because the paint wasn't the exact color and isn't or wasn't faded/changed by weather the same amount as the rest of it. 

    It's not impossible to get something extremely close in a rattle can from just any store but it's very likely even if you do get the exact same color it's not going to match perfectly. Getting a touch up can from a dealer or body shop is your best chance of having it match as closely as possible. 

    Look at the VIN sticker and get the paint color code and look that color code up online. You might be able to find a rattle or touch up can of it on amazon or somewhere. You'll at least find some info on it that you don't already know from researching the color code. 

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  • CB
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If you can find the correct color in a rattle can of paint your best bet is to get enough to paint the entire bumper - this means sanding the whole bumper and masking off the rest of the car near where you are spraying. 

    Spot repairs on faded paint will stick out like a soar thumb but if the paint comes up to a break or sharp turn in the body panels it will be hard to see the slight shade change. 

    This is an old house painting trick, if you run out of paint in a room and need to buy a fresh gallon by starting at any corner to any other corner will keep the minor shade difference from being noticed. Starting a new gallon in the middle of a wall will be noticable.  

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  • JetDoc
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It's unlikely that you are going to match the paint on your 12-year-old car with something off the shelf. Your car's paint has faded slightly over the years, and any touch-up paint you buy would be noticeably brighter. If you want a perfect match, you'll need someone to mix a custom color for you. Could get expensive.

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  • 1 month ago

    The car will have a paint code, and that can be used to order the same shade of paint that was applied to the car when it was brand new. 

    But exposure to sunlight and weather can and do change the colour, sometimes imperceptibly, sometimes quite radically (as with many reds and yellows). Also, the roof, hood, and trunk lids usually end up different to the sides of the car, even if you cannot see the difference. So taking the vehicle or a part of the outer bodywork from adjacent to the repair site to an automotive paint supplier allows them to use a colorimeter to determine exactly which mixture to use to produce paint which exactly matches what is already there. 

    Paint codes are really only of use for nearly new cars or for those looking for a quick cheap fix without regard for an exact paint match.

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  • 1 month ago

    There should be a data plate with the paint code on it. Look on the pillars below the door catch, or else under the hood.

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  • audrey
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    If you take your car to a dealer, they can order you perfectly matched spray paint by using make, model, year and vin number.

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