Windows 10 SSD/Hard Drive?

I bought a brand new computer but it only has an SSD in it so i bought a Hard Drive separately but i have no idea how to configure it to make my SSD the Boot Drive and my new Hard Drive the Storage for everything else.

I have tried looking up answers on google but everything that shows up only shows how to configure an SSD from a Hard Drive that is already in it and not the other way around.

any help is appreciated.

9 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    set the BIOS ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

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  • 1 month ago

    You simply install the spin up hard drive and the system will find it.. When you install programs just install them to the secondary drive letter

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  • 1 month ago

    "Everything else"? Tough. Because that goes against the grain of Windows.

    Yes, it is possible to keep only the OS on the boot drive and put everything else on a different drive. It is also (usually) much more effort than the result is worth. But, depending on what "everything else" actually is, it's easy to achieve a decent compromise. Keep the OS, the software installations and the windows specific user folders on the SSD, and simply place your data on the second drive manually.

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  • 1 month ago

    You'll have got the message, the SSD is already the primary drive, contains the operating system and is the one the computer boots from.  You need do nothing in this respect.

    You install the new hard drive and it will appear as (probably) the D drive.  To use it as storage you simply put what you want on there.  

    For what it's worth someone has calculated that an SSD in normal use will last for about 30 years. How they calculated it I don't know. And that's far longer than anyone would expect ANY drive to last.

    • K-SiS
      Lv 4
      1 month agoReport

      If SSD crashes, recovery chance is Zero, Otherwise SSD is BEST

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  • 1 month ago

    Change it in the BIOS!!!!

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    You will want to move all of your profile folders to the HDD, while keeping Windows and all Apps in the SSD. To do this you will want to put your Users folder in the D: drive. You can follow the instructions in this tutorial:

    https://is.gd/hC0SwT

    The profile folders contain all of your typical user data, such as Word documents, videos, photos, etc.

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  • 1 month ago

    The SSD contains the operating system. For faster performance, put only programs you wish to operate fastest on that drive, like some games.

    When you install other programs, the installer will ask you for the drive and directory where it is to be installed and saved.  The default is C:\  the boot drive and under the root.  At that time, chose the alternative drive letter D:\ or some other letter of the hard disk drive.  You can also supply a folder name, like D:\utility\

    You can save any documents or photos or videos or music to that D:\ drive and folders you make.  You can tell Windows 10 that the library locations for those media items is on the D:\ drive.

    In Browser windows like IE, Edge, and Google Chrome, you can tell in settings where the default location of downloads is--like on the D:\ drive.

    It is important to do those settings so you will not fill up your SSD with the operating system.

    Source(s): Using computers since 1962. Building, repairing and updating PCs for a few decades. College computer classes instructor.
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  • 1 month ago

    your SSD is already properly configured. The new HDD will be added by Windows 10 [possibly after formatting]. However, getting your programs to store their files on the HDD requires individually setting the program to do that ... poke around in their menus

    Source(s): grampa
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  • 1 month ago

    If the new computer has only an SSD, then that's your primary drive.  It has Windows on it, the computer boots from it, etc.

    All you have to do to add a hard drive is to physically install it (screw it to the inside of the case, connect the two cables, one to power, one to a SATA port on the motherboard).

    When you turn the computer back on, open This PC and you should see the new drive with a new letter.  And that's it!  You can open it just like a folder and move stuff to it.

    Now an SSD doesn't last as long as a hard drive.  Each cell on an SSD can be written to only so many times.  So you want to configure the computer so it does most of its reading/writing to the hard drive.  This means moving your User folders to the hard drive--Documents, Photos, Videos, Music, Downloads, etc.  If you use these folders to store all your stuff.  You want to have programs on the SSD and data on the hard drive.  This is not essential but it might help your SSD live longer.

    (I have never seen an SSD fail, I've just read that it could happen eventually.  If you keep an SSD half full it will last MUCH longer.  The more full it is the faster it's supposed to die.  Obviously your computer was made to use the SSD for everything.  I think most new computers these days have only an SSD, so it can't be that bad.)

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