Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Cars & TransportationBuying & Selling · 1 month ago

Is a Japanese car safe? Will it be more troublesome to repair a Japanese car as it will be damaged more seriously in a traffic accident?

It's said that the bodyshell of a Japanese car is much thinner. So it's lighter and more fuel-efficient. This is my friend's  tip for me.

Update:

What about a German car?

Update 2:

My firend's Audi crashed into a Toyota sedan. He wasn't wounded. His car only dropped its bumper. But the front of the Toyota was smashed. The airbag inflated. The driver was bleeding and unconscious. I believe he wasn't bragging.

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  • Bort
    Lv 6
    1 month ago
    Favorite Answer

    It is true that the chasis of a vehicle manufactured in Asian countries is generally much thinner metal or plastics (many types including fiberglass) than what American manufacturers produce.

    Is it safer to have a thicker shell? Well of course it is! The thicker the barrier is the more force it takes to damage or destory it ; and in a vehicle get to the passengers. Obstructions obstruct and decrease force. When a force meets another object it is obstructed and it's force(s) are decreased depending on how dense the object it contacts is.

    More dense = more force decreased

    Less dense = less dence decreased

    So the thicker the shell the better chances there are that G forces that injure a person are decreased.

    That said, however, there are still going to be inertial forces.

    Here is the laymans terms:

    If you're going 60mph and hit a cement barrier or wall you're dead. Very unlikely to survive.

    If you're going 60mph and hit a plastic barrier or wall you're a lot more likely to survive because the inertia of velocity and force is more than a plastic obstruction can effect.

    The nerd technologics to all of the things required to answer your question are why it takes several years of education to educate an engineer to answer this question. There is simply way too much math and way too many variables you didn't specify or give a number to to say "yes" or "no".

    The fact remains that, yes, Asian countries manufacure vehicles with thinner chasis. They do that to save money but because of the difference between standards in each country it still passes 'standard' evaluation (and crash) tests.

    Buy a tank or a bulldozer to insure you'll survive a crash.

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  • 1 month ago

    There is no difference between the structure of Japanese and American cars, except that Japanese cars are usually built much better and more reliable. You friend's tip was true in 1958, but after 1965 or so, Japanese cars have been far better in quality than ours.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    It's true that even a bicycle may smash the bodyshell of a J-car. But it's safe because of other factors: structure, materials etc. And DIY J-car maintenance saves you a lot. A German car must go to a dealership for that. It's a math problem.

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  • 1 month ago

    Your friend is an idiot, and has no idea what he's talking about. In an accident, the angle in which a car is hit or hits another, combined with the velocity, size and weight of the car, materials, as well as road conditions, will determine the amount of damage done. Dropping a bumper is a design cue that most modern cars have. It is designed to absorb an impact, spread it out, and fall off. Better to drop a bumper than than hit the unibody frame and possibly total a car. 

    IIHS Top safety picks show that Japanese cars are EXTREMELY safe. Of the 58 cars selected in 2019, SIX were German (a Volkwagen Golf GTI, Audi A3, Audi A4, BMW 3-Seris sedan, Mercedes C-Class sedan, and a Mercedes E-Class Sedan). That's it. By comparison, there were twenty-four Japanese cars (Toyota, Lexus, Honda, Mazda, and Nissan). The safest vehicles on the road were actually Korean, Kia/Hyundai/Genesis (same company) had 20 entries by itself. 

    In short, YES, Japanese cars are safe. 

    https://www.iihs.org/ratings/top-safety-picks

    Source(s): 20 years retail auto sales experience.
    • here You gO again cAlling people Names

      you are not a very nice person

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  • 1 month ago

    Vehicle safety reports are easily available on the Internet if you simply do a search -- or you can keep listening to your ignorant friend.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    I don't think the thinness has much to do with it.  I am not concerned with my Mazda.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    If you have a driver's license, then you know how to operate the steering wheel and brake pedal.  Does your friend drive a Sherman TANK? (It is lousy in cornering and terrible acceleration, top speed is MAYBE 30mph. and the sound system is to die for.)

    The cars are built in such a way today that pieces pop off and are swapped for new.  No more BONDO BUGGIES.

    German cars are built lighter too all for economy. and crumplebility.

    Your friend lives in the dark ages.  

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    Your friend is likely still fixing his Ford Tempo.

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  • Anonymous
    1 month ago

    It sounds like your friend is stuck in the 70's. This hasn't been true in 40 or 50 years. Back in the 70's, it might have been true to a certain extent, not because the bodies of the J-cars were thinner, but just because the J-cars were much smaller than American cars. A-cars being bigger and heavier had an inherent advantage over smaller lighter cars. Eventually by the 80's, A-cars were also built the same way as J-cars, and any advantages or disadvantages disappeared.

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