Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Arts & HumanitiesGenealogy · 2 months ago

Am I Polish or Lithuanian?

My great Granddad was born in Vilnius but apparently at the time it was considered Poland? I’m not sure, but would that mean I have Polish or Lithuanian DNA? Please no rude or sarcastic answers because I’m genuinely trying to educate myself here

7 Answers

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  • 1 month ago

    You are an American (or wherever you hold citizenship through birth or naturalization) with some Polish/Lithuanian ancestry.

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  • 1 month ago

    Your DNA can be different because you have many ancestors, for example other seven great-grandparents. Without a DNA test you won't know. But if you are interested in your Great Granddad's identity, you should research what language he and his relatives used the most: Polish, Lithuanian, Yiddish, Russian etc? Vilnius is and has always been a multi ethnic city. What was his religion? Catholic? Eastern Orthodox Christian? Jewish? There are even rare, "exotic" combinations in/around Vilnius, just like Roman Catholic Belarusians, rural Karaite Jews, and Lithuanian speaker Muslim Volga Tatars. So you have a chance to find interesting stories and ancestry.

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  • Maxi
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    'You' are neither Polish or Lithuanian and the ONLY way to know who your ancestors were and where they came from is to research the records they generated during their lifetime...no DNA test will tell you that as they are sold to entertain and nothing more

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  • Marli
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    My grandparents were born in Ukraine in the 1880s, but neither they nor their parents were Ukrainian.  I took the spit test for DNA and was told that my ancestors were North German - Netherlands. (which I already knew and I'm sure the Ancestry.com  people knew from my surname.)

    So the place one is born is not a clear indication of one's ancestral homeland.

    I'd like to know whether some Scots who have taken a DNA test have similar DNA as mine. Some names are similar in both areas.  Not quite the same due to centuries of accent changes affecting spellings.

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    • Marli
      Lv 7
      1 month agoReport

      Russian Empress Catherine the Great was German by birth and when Ukraine entered the Russian Empire, she opened it to German settlers.  That's when my ancestors came to Ukraine.

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  • Zirp
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Nope. You don't have the nationality ("passport"), nor speak it as native language

    DNA doesn't have a nationality, so there's no such thing as Polish DNA

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  • 2 months ago

    National borders are always changing. That's why a DNA test will show your ancestry coming from a region rather than a specific city. The people of Poland and Lithuania have similar characteristics because there was migration within that region over a sustained period of time. Your great-granddad was one of eight people contributing to your DNA, so the majority of your ancestry probably comes from somewhere else.

    • Moonlight2 months agoReport

      I was just trying to figure it out because ancestry lists Lithuania as a Reigon for me, and I didn’t know until yesterday that the place he was born is the capital of Lithuania but everyone is saying he’s Polish, so I’m just confused 

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  • 2 months ago

    You have whatever DNA your granddad had. DNA does not have a nationality attached to it.

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