My best friend's dad is refusing to do some crucial paperwork for her college loans/financial aid, what can she do?

My best friend's dad is being a total a$$, and withholding his signature for her financial aid paperwork. I don't know all the details, but since she's 18 now, are there any loopholes? Her parents are divorced and she lives with her mom. Can he even declare her a dependent on his taxes since he doesn't live with her? Is he technically financially responsible for her? Does she even NEED a parent signature now? Help! I don't want to go to college without my best friend!!

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  • 4 weeks ago

    She does still need a parent signature; students are considered dependent for financial aid purposes unless and until they are 24 years old, have gotten married, have dependents of their own*, or have enlisted in the military.

    That said, if she's lived with her mom for most of the last 12 months, she should be using mom's information for FAFSA.

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  • Anonymous
    4 weeks ago

    But she must listen to her dad first,and after wards she has to shout in the owner or assitant,s ear,nowaday politely,but,to do be telling the trouble and references off!

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  • 1 month ago

    She is in luck (sort of) by her parents being divorced. The person who takes care of your friend 51% of the time can claim her on their taxes and their info would go on the FAFSA. Sounds like she lives with her Mom, so perfect. Her mother's financial info will go on the FAFSA along with yours. Get started. The sooner the better.

    Source(s): Former Financial Aid Director
    • ...Show all comments
    • Only one parent can claim her on their taxes. If your parents are divorced and not living together, the one who you live with most will be the one on your FAFSA. If you have split time 50/50, which parent supported you more financially? If you are still unsure, give your financial aid office a call.

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  • nancy
    Lv 7
    1 month ago

    It depends on what the required paperwork is. Dependency on the FAFSA and dependency on the tax return are two different things. For the FAFSA, dependency is determined by the student's answers to a series of questions on the application (are you over 24, married, supporting your own dependent, in the military, etc). If your friend can't answer yes to one of those questions, she is considered a dependent for financial aid purposes and must provide parent information on the FAFSA. If the parents are divorced, then the student must provide the information only for the parent she lived with the most during the past 12 months. It does not matter whether the student is claimed on that parent's tax return or not. The FAFSA asks for parent tax information as a way of confirming income information, but it does not require that the student be claimed on that parent's tax return because there are a number of legitimate reasons why that parent might not claim the student as a dependent. For example, divorced parents might have a court order that determines who can claim a child, or foreign parents might file a return that doesn't ask about dependents, or a low income parent might not have to file at all. So, even if your friend was claimed on her father's return, she would not have to provide his information to be eligible for federal student aid. BUT......some colleges do require non-custodial parent information when it comes to awarding their own institutional aid, so it's possible that the school is requesting the documents for that purpose. The school still has to award any federal aid that she qualifies for, but if she doesn't provide the requested documents, then she wouldn't receive funds from the school's own resources. At high cost schools, often these funds are a much larger part of the financial aid package than federal aid, so if that's the case, your friend has some difficult choices to make. She can decide to attend the school with just the limited federal aid. Or she can choose to attend a school that doesn't require information from the non-custodial parent (most schools don't, so there are many she could choose from). For the record, a parent can generally claim a student as a dependent if she is a full time student under the age of 24 and lives with the parent more than half time. However, divorced parents often have court orders that permit the non-custodial parent to claim the child as a dependent for tax purposes even though the child isn't living with him. So, yes, it's entirely possible that her father could claim her. Being over 18 may make her legally an adult, but for the purposes of financial aid, she is still considered a dependent until she is 24 . So yes, she probably does need to provide a parent signature on the FAFSA, but if she's living with her mom it would be her mother's signature, not her father's. This is general information and there may be other factors that are affecting your friend's aid, so I would encourage her to contact the school's financial aid staff and discuss the situation with them for specific guidance.

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  • di
    Lv 4
    1 month ago

    A student is supposed to file their FAFSA with the parent that provides the most support - so in this case, it might be her Mom.  Dad's biographic information should be removed from the FAFSA application, and Mom (&stepdad if there is one) should be the reporting parent who provides biographic and income information and who signs the FAFSA.

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  • 1 month ago

    Parents put you thru high school.  But there's no requirement to put them thru college.  So why doesn't mom sign??    

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  • 1 month ago

    Since your friend is eighteen and therefore an adult, her father is not financially responsible for her anymore, and she doesn't need a parent signature.

     As someone who will enter college in a few years, I recommend her some other methods for financial aid. I'll be turning eighteen in a little over a year and a half, and I've already decided to not ask my parents for money after my eighteenth birthday. I've had a bank account since this summer(I currently have a little over $300); if your friend hadn't already started saving money, she should start doing that. I'm also planning on registering for a scholarship at my school choir and I'll be registering for more scholarships when I enter college.

  • 1 month ago

    she needs to talk to financial aids about it

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