Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Consumer ElectronicsCameras · 2 months ago

What's more accurate dSLR camera or smartphone camera?

10 Answers

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  • 2 months ago

    DSLR Camera always best compare with Smartphone Camera. 

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  • Frank
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Depends upon what you mean by "accurate."  If by accurate you mean that the image is equal to or very close to the way the human eye would have seen the same scene, then a smartphone is one of the least accurate.  Why?  Because of the wide-angle lens in smartphones.  The wide lens in smartphones distort the perspective as can be seen in this link: http://www.stepheneastwood.com/tutorials/lensdisto...

    As you can see, the woman's face get terribly distorted and she becomes uglier as the focal length decreases.  For reference, the lens in your smartphone is typically about 5mm or 28mm equivalent to 35mm format.  

    Now, if you were to use an equivalent lens on a DSLR, the image would be just as inaccurate as the image taken with the phone.  However, with a DSLR you have the ability to use longer focal lengths such as 43mm which is produces a perspective very close to the human eye.  Use a longer focal length and instead of the perspective being stretched out like it is with wide-angle lenses, the perspective is flattened.  This flattening affect actually makes people look better and more attractive than they may look in real life.  For this reasons, lenses in the 85-150mm (35mm format) have traditionally been called portrait lenses.  No photographer with an ounce of experience would ever use a wide-lens for a portrait for the obvious reasons shown in the link.

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  • Anonymous
    2 months ago

    Answer is for entertainment purposes only.  Zero liability.  

    A smartphone has one lens. 

    Choosing the correct prime lens for a DSLR should allow for better accuracy.

    It really depends on both the lens clarity and software being used to imitate film. 

    Also buying an aftermarket smartphone or DSLR lens will easily ruin accuracy and quality.

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  • 2 months ago

    the "photographer" makes the photo.  Learn to use the lens/equipment

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  • 2 months ago

    Accuracy is not normally a trait to consider in cameras.

    If an "accurate" IMAGE is desired,

    both the camera And the person operating it must be capable of the task.

    It is not likely to occur without considerable effort and skill being applied.

    • Chris2 months agoReport

      yes

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  • keerok
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    Cameras never take exactly how our eyes see it. The fact that the dSLR camera is fully adjustable makes it "worse". It can be made to make the picture look better than the real thing.

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  • qrk
    Lv 7
    2 months ago

    I can make a DSLR image be very inaccurate, especially when using an ultra-wide lens and taking a shot a foot away. I can also fiddle with the white balance and create ghastly colours. In those cases, the phone camera wins if you take a shot at a reasonable distance and your lighting is within the white balance range.

    However, if I use a proper lens, exposure settings, and use proper rules regarding distance, I can make a DSLR behave quite admirably. This case, the phone camera looses. Problem with phone cameras, you can't change the optics, which has issues, and many don't allow you to change the exposure settings.

    • Chris2 months agoReport

      yes

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  • hooray
    Lv 5
    2 months ago

    Operated properly, the DSLR every time. I've written countless articles just on what "accurate" even means though. How far down the rabbit hole are you prepared to go?

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  • 2 months ago

    More accurate in what way?  Lens distortions, colour fidelity, depth of field effects etc?

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  • 2 months ago

    both only capture a perspective. I'm a photographer and I would say a DSLR is more accurate as it typically has more pixels and can therefore take in more "information/detail' of something than a smartphone camera. But to be completely honest, it doesn't matter what type of camera you use, its all about how you want to capture the image.

    • Chris2 months agoReport

      yes

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